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Mayo Clinic Q&A

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January 04, 2021
Healthier eating to kick-start the new year
As the new year kicks off, many people renew or begin a commitment to improving their health. Often, that starts with healthy eating, and this year it might include kicking bad habits developed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Katherine Zeratsky, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Mayo Clinic, offers nutrition tips and suggests small changes that can lead to better eating habits and help you shift to healthier eating in 2021.

 
January 03, 2021
Regenerative medicine offers an alternative to hip replacement
Hip replacement surgery is a common procedure that is necessary when the hip joint is worn or damaged. But what if the joint replacement could be avoided? Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine is pioneering alternatives for some patients.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Rafael Sierra, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, discusses regenerative medicine alternatives to hip replacement, which is now available for some patients.

 
January 01, 2021
Opioid crisis worsens during COVID-19 pandemic
Stress, isolation and limited access to resources are fueling rising rates of substance abuse and overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic. While coronavirus has been the focus of so much attention this year, the opioid crisis has continued unabated and has even worsened. More than 40 states have reported increases in opioid related deaths, according to the American Medical Association.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tyler Oesterle, a psychiatrist and addiction expert at Mayo Clinic, discusses opioid use disorders and treatment options, including virtual medicine available during the pandemic.

 
December 30, 2020
COVID-19 weekly update
2020 has been a year consumed by COVID-19, from first news of the virus in the U.S. in January to vaccines rolling out in December. Scientists, health care providers and the public have gained new knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and virus transmission, and COVID-19 vaccines were developed in record time.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, looks back at what has been learned in 2020, and forward to the possibility of controlling COVID-19 in 2021.

 
December 29, 2020
COVID-19 mortality study shows effectiveness of team-based care
A recent Mayo Clinic study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedingsfound that patients with COVID-19 who received care at Mayo Clinic had lower mortality rates than the national average. Mayo Clinic patients were treated using an integrated, team-based approach for patient monitoring and treatment.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. John O'Horo, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases physician and the study's first author, discusses the study results and explains how the Mayo Clinic Model of Care improves outcomes for patients.

 
December 28, 2020
Coping with relationship stress during the COVID-19 pandemic
The holiday season can be stressful all on its own, but add the COVID-19 pandemic and you have the potential for increased anxiety. With health concerns and potential financial worries, coupled with being inside for the winter, some relationships might be feeling the tension of too much togetherness.

"At the beginning of the pandemic, I was hearing a lot from couples that I work with, about how much they were appreciating the ability to spend more time together," says Dr. Jennifer Vencill, a Mayo Clinic psychologist. "But that story is starting to shift a little."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Vencill talks about positive habits, intentional communication and virtual counseling, and she offers strategies for struggling relationships.

 
December 27, 2020
Complex shoulder and elbow surgeries
Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the function of a joint by replacing disease and damaged parts. However, everyone is not made the same way. When it comes to complex shoulder and elbow surgeries, 3D anatomical modeling can be used to help a surgeon plan the surgery for better outcomes.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Mark Morrey, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, discusses common elbow and shoulder problems, and treatment options, including surgery.

 
December 23, 2020
COVID-19 vaccinations happening in phases
Front-line health care workers across the country are receiving the first COVID-19 vaccinations. With the recent approval of a second COVID-19 vaccine for use here in the U.S., more COVID-19 vaccine doses are expected to be available this week.

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention panel has recommended allocating COVID-19 vaccines for the next phase. Phase 1b includes those who are 75 and older as well as front-line essential workers, including police, firefighters, teachers and grocery store workers. These vaccinations would begin when phase 1a, health care workers and long term care residents, is completed.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, gives an update on vaccine approvals and the rollout phases.

 
December 22, 2020
Addressing disparities to prevent disease
Several communities and populations are underserved by the U.S. health care system. There are many reasons for this, including differences in risk incidence, morbidity and mortality due to social, economic and structural factors. And the COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed these health care inequities.

"The term health care equity actually implies justice and fairness, as well as intentional action," says Dr. Chyke Doubeni, director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Health Equity and Community Engagement Research. "So, as a matter of fact, inequities stem from injustices and failures to act. As a society, we have to address this. These are things that are fixable."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Doubeni discusses strategies to eliminate health care disparities in underserved populations and how Mayo Clinic is reaching out to communities.

 
December 21, 2020
Using regenerative medicine to treat knee pain
Knee pain is a common problem that can have many causes, but one common reason is damage to the cartilage. Because cartilage doesn't have its own blood supply, it can't heal itself. When knee cartilage is damaged, treatment options are available, including a new method using a patient’s own cells to grow new cartilage. The new technique is called matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation, or MACI.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Daniel Saris, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, discusses MACI, the regenerative medicine approach to treating knee cartilage damage.

 
December 19, 2020
Study finds unique form of immunosuppression caused by brain cancer
The latest direction in cancer treatment has been toward potential cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. As these therapies become standard, continued research is important to understand how the body interacts with these treatments. A recent Mayo Clinic study found a unique form of immunosuppression caused by brain cancer that could inhibit the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. The findings were recently published in the journal, Brain.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Aaron J. Johnson, a professor of immunology at Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Katayoun (Kathy) Ayasoufi, a research associate in Dr. Johnson's lab in the Department of immunology, discuss the importance of basic science research and explain how understanding the immunosuppression caused by brain cancer could lead to improved treatments for patients.

 
December 18, 2020
Type 1 diabetes in children
Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which a child's body no longer produces insulin, an important hormone. The missing insulin needs to be replaced with injections or with an insulin pump. The diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming. Depending on his or her age, the child must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. There's no cure for Type 1 diabetes in children, but it can be managed effectively.

This edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Joining Dr. Mattke to discuss Type 1 diabetes in children are Dr. Ana Creo, a pediatric endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, and Janet Hansen, a pediatric diabetes nurse coordinator at Mayo Clinic Children's Center.

 
December 17, 2020
Don’t hesitate, dive into data for COVID-19 vaccine
The news about COVID-19 vaccines being approved, distributed and administered so quickly is causing concern for some people — what is often referred to as vaccine hesitancy.

"We have always struggled with vaccine hesitancy and a sense of uncertainty," says Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatric infectious diseases expert and director of Mayo Clinic's Primary Care Immunization program. "But what we have available through this emergency use authorization is worth taking now. I would not delay doing what I could to protect my patients and myself."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jacobson dives into the data, detailing how the randomized controlled trials worked. He also answers questions about COVID-19 vaccines for children and pregnant women, explains why the vaccine doesn't change your genetic makeup and much more.

 
December 16, 2020
A vaccine milestone
The Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have approved the first of several COVID-19 vaccines developed in response to the pandemic. The first vaccine has been distributed to all 50 states, and vaccinations are underway. Development of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has been an extraordinary effort of science and engineering.

"This is a milestone human achievement by any measure," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. and the timeline for vaccinations.

 
December 15, 2020
3D printing helps patients and medical teams
3D printing can provide an exact replica of a body part. But the printing process is not building or molding the model in traditional ways. The technology creates a solid 3D object by taking thin imaging slices from computer files. Mayo Clinic has been working with 3D printing for at least 16 years, applying it to clinical and surgical areas.

"And one of the many benefits we have from 3D printing is the ability to inform the patient," says Dr. Jonathan Morris, a Mayo Clinic neuroradiologist.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Morris explains how 3D printing works and how medical teams have used it during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
December 14, 2020
Treating back pain with spinal cord stimulation
Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to their health care provider or miss work, and it is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Most back pain gradually improves with home treatment and over-the-counter pain relievers. But for some people, back pain can be a debilitating problem that requires more advanced treatment. One option for persistent back pain is an implanted spinal cord stimulator that uses low levels of electricity to intercept or block pain signals. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tim Lamer, an anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic, explains how spinal cord stimulation devices are implanted and used to relieve persistent back pain.
 
December 12, 2020
Residency training adjusts to pandemic restrictions
Like many parts of life during the COVID-19 pandemic, medical education has had to adjust to necessary restrictions on in-person training, meetings and classes. While patient safety comes first, training the next generation of medical professionals needed to continue during the ongoing pandemic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jonathan Barlow, director of the Orthopedic Residency program at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, explains how Mayo Clinic has adjusted during the pandemic to continue delivering medical education to fellows, residents and medical students. Dr. Barlow also discusses Mayo Clinic's efforts to diversify its cohort of students.

 
December 11, 2020
How virtual meetings affect your mind, body
To stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, many people have transitioned to working from home or working from offices with social distancing and using virtual technology to connect with others. Much of life has gone virtual, including schooling, but how does this affect you psychologically and physically?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jeffrey Staab, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic, discusses the psychologic and physical effects of virtual meetings.

 
December 10, 2020
Pandemic screen time
Monitoring screen time for children can be a challenge for parents and caregivers under normal circumstances. But with the COVID-19 pandemic, remote schooling has increased the amount of time students are glued to computer monitors and smartphone screens.

"Depending on the age of the child there are some considerations, because our younger children are just not meant to be staring at a screen for six, seven hours a day," says Dr. Tina Ardon, a Mayo Clinic Family Medicine physician.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Ardon talks about the challenges, frustrations and problem-solving skills needed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
December 09, 2020
COVID-19 vaccine update
Last week, the first COVID-19 vaccine was approved for emergency authorization use in the United Kingdom. Meanwhile in the U.S., plans are being made to distribute COVID-19 vaccines, pending approval by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a committee within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommends that health care workers and elderly people living in long-term care facilities receive top priority for COVID-19 vaccination in the U.S.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, gives an update on vaccine approval and discusses logistics COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

 
December 08, 2020
Social isolation during COVID-19
As the COVID-19 surge sweeps across the U.S., it's crucial that people stay home and avoid gatherings to reduce community spread of the virus.

But for some, that loneliness is becoming an epidemic within the pandemic. Social isolation, especially for people in high-risk health care facilities, like nursing homes, is taking a toll on their mental health.

Health care professionals say people have an intuitive desire to gather and seek companionship. Even introverts are struggling with isolation.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Anita Bissinger, a Mayo Clinic Health System social worker, says people have been innovative and mindful of the fact people are lonely and need to support each other. This social isolation isn't forever and there are ways to combat the seclusion.

 
December 07, 2020
Isolation, stress and the pandemic affecting those with eating disorders
Eating disorders are complex medical issues, and the COVID-19 pandemic has created additional challenges for people who battle these disorders. For some, being home with constant access to food is difficult. For others, the lack of social support is a struggle.

Now isolation and stress are contributing to an increased risk of people developing eating disorders.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Leslie Sim, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, addresses eating disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
December 04, 2020
Two ends of the nutrition spectrum in children
Pediatric growth charts track growth in infants, children and adolescents. While children can go through brief periods where they gain or lose a little weight, if children don't gain weight or grow well, they may be diagnosed with failure to thrive.

On the other end of the nutrition spectrum are children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This occurs when too much fat is stored in the liver and can cause problems for the liver’s normal functioning.

This edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. To discuss the nutrition spectrum in children, Dr. Mattke is joined by Dr. Dana Steien, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Sara Hassan, a pediatric gastroenterologist and transplant hepatologist at Mayo Clinic.

 
December 04, 2020
Two ends of nutrition spectrum in children
Pediatric growth charts track growth in infants, children and adolescents. While children can go through brief periods where they gain or lose a little weight, if children don\\\'t gain weight or grow well, they may be diagnosed with failure to thrive.

On the other end of the nutrition spectrum are children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This occurs when too much fat is stored in the liver and can cause problems for the liver’s normal functioning.

This edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children\\\'s Center. To discuss the nutrition spectrum in children, Dr. Mattke is joined by Dr. Dana Steien, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Sara Hassan, a pediatric gastroenterologist and transplant hepatologist at Mayo Clinic.

 
December 03, 2020
Regenerative medicine helps with facial reconstruction after skin cancer
For generations, people have intentionally and unintentionally exposed their skin to the sun. As a result, skin cancer has become the most common form of cancer in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Treatment options are limited for people with skin cancer, especially on the face and more specifically the nose.

Dr. Brittany E. Howard, a Mayo Clinic otolaryngologist, and head and neck surgeon, says the cancer often leaves a patient with deformities. And these patients sometimes require prosthetics. Dr. Howard specializes in facial plastic and reconstruction.

However, Dr. Howard says there is a relatively uncommon reconstructive surgery, using regenerative medicine techniques, that can help a patient return to a new normal and feel less self-conscious.

"After we treat the cancer, the specialized team can work with the patient all the way through the reconstruction surgery," says Dr. Howard.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Howard talks about research by Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine and the Mayo Clinic surgical team that can reconstruct parts of a patient's face.

 
December 02, 2020
How messenger RNA vaccines work
The first COVID-19 vaccines to reach the market are likely to be messenger RNA vaccines, or mRNA. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mRNA vaccines work by teaching cells in the body how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. Unlike many vaccines that use a weakened or inactivated form of a virus, mRNA vaccines do not use the live virus that causes COVID-19.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, explains how mRNA vaccines work, gives a status update on the pandemic and answers listener questions.

 
December 01, 2020
Managing the COVID-19 surge
The current COVID-19 surge numbers could worsen in coming days as experts prepare for a post-Thanksgiving holiday increase in cases. Increased positivity rates lead to more people needing hospitalization, straining the health care system and medical staff.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Elie Berbari, chair of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Mayo Clinic, explains how Mayo Clinic is managing staff, supplies and space during the COVID-19 surge.

 
November 30, 2020
Mayo Clinic expands living liver donation program
More than 12,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for a liver transplant, and 1 in 5 of those on the national waiting list will die or become too sick before an organ becomes available. Due to the shortage of available deceased donor organs, Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is expanding its living liver donation program. While living donors traditionally have been people who know the recipient, such as a family member or friend, the Mayo Clinic program now include non directed and paired donation options.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Timucin Taner, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon, discusses the process of living liver donation and shares information on becoming an organ donor.

 
November 25, 2020
Finding relief from epileptic seizures
Eric Berg has had seizures due to epilepsy since he was 12 years old. This past year, his seizures increased in frequency, affecting his day-to-day life and his ability to work. With encouragement from his fiancee, Eric sought treatment at Mayo Clinic.

At Mayo Clinic, experts are using a new way to treat some seizure disorders: repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, or rTMS. This treatment uses a magnetic field to stimulate certain areas of the brain. While often used to treat depression, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation also is showing promise in treating seizures.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Eric Berg shares his story. His physician, Dr. Jeffrey Britton, a neurologist and chair of the Division of Epilepsy at Mayo Clinic, also joins the podcast and explains how repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is used to treat seizure disorders.

 
November 24, 2020
CDC recommends no Thanksgiving travel
Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, celebrating the Thanksgiving holiday will look different for families across the country this year. As the pandemic worsens, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends no Thanksgiving travel, instead asking Americans to stay home and celebrate only with their immediate household to reduce the risk of spreading the virus.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, explains the need to stay home and stay safe this holiday season. Also on the podcast, Dr. Poland discusses emergency use authorizations for COVID-19 vaccines and how these vaccines will be distributed across the country.

 
November 23, 2020
Remote monitoring for COVID-19 patients
COVID-19 patients may experience a mild case of the illness, and others may experience the most severe symptoms, which can lead to death.

There are some patients who recover at home but are monitored as they're healing. For instance, these patients need to check their vital signs daily, including oxygen saturation levels, body temperature an blood pressure.

Dr. Tufia Haddad, a Mayo Clinic oncologist and medical director of the Center for Connected Care's Remote Patient Monitoring program, at Mayo Clinic, says the program is a way to deliver patient care between clinical visits to make sure their health is improving.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Haddad details how the program works for patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

 
November 20, 2020
Interventions and resources after autism spectrum disorder diagnosis
Autism spectrum disorder is a condition related to brain development that affects how a person perceives and socializes with others, causing problems in social interaction and communication. The disorder also includes limited and repetitive patterns of behavior. The term "spectrum" in autism spectrum disorder refers to the wide range of symptoms and severity.

This special edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Joining Dr. Mattke to discuss interventions and resources for children with autism is Dr. Maja Katusic a Mayo Clinic developmental-behavioral pediatrician.

 
November 19, 2020
What young men need to know about testicular cancer
While testicular cancer is rare compared with other types of cancer, it is the most common cancer in American males ages 15 to 35. Testicular cancer is highly treatable, even when cancer has spread beyond the testicle. Several treatments or a combination of treatments are available, and long-term survival rates are greater than 90%.

As a part of men's health and the Movember Foundation's focus on testicular cancer, Dr. Matthew Ziegelmann, a Mayo Clinic urologist, joins the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast to discuss diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer.

 
November 18, 2020
Men’s health – Treating erectile dysfunction
When it comes to medical care, men are less likely to seek care than women. While men may typically avoid seeing their health care provider, some problems often prompt them to take action.

One complaint that can bring men to the doctor's office is erectile dysfunction, which is the inability to get and keep an erection firm enough for sex. Since erectile dysfunction also can be a sign of an underlying health condition that needs treatment, and it is a risk factor for heart disease, it is important for men to talk to their health care provider. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Sevann Helo, a Mayo Clinic urologist, discusses men's sexual health and treatments for erectile dysfunction, as well as male infertility.

 
November 17, 2020
COVID-19 vaccine trials update
While the number of COVID-19 cases continues to surge, there is positive news on the vaccine front. In early clinical trial data, two vaccines have now shown at least 90% effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. While more time and research is needed to understand how long the immunity from a vaccine lasts, experts believe a vaccine could be approved for emergency use authorization before the end of the year.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses the latest on current COVID-19 clinical trials. Dr. Poland also explains what public health experts mean by community spread of the virus and why that leads to exponential growth in cases of COVID-19.

 
November 16, 2020
Epilepsy Awareness Month
Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system and causes seizures. More than 3 million Americans and more than 65 million people worldwide have epilepsy - a key reason that November is recognized as National Epilepsy Awareness Month. Thankfully, treatment with medications or sometimes surgery can control seizures for most people with epilepsy.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Joseph Sirven, a Mayo Clinic neurologist, discusses the importance of raising awareness of epilepsy to lessen the stigma, Dr. Sirven also highlights the latest in treatments and research.

 
November 13, 2020
Cardiometabolic diseases increase COVID-19 risk
An estimated 47 million Americans are living with cardiometabolic diseases, according to the American College of Cardiology. Cardiometabolic diseases are interrelated conditions that include cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, and hypertension, as well as metabolic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with cardiometabolic diseases have a higher risk of not only developing COVID-19, but also developing complications related to COVID-19.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, discusses lifestyle factors that affect cardiometabolic diseases and how COVID-19 can damage the heart.

 
November 12, 2020
Fighting COVID-19 with Mayo Clinic Laboratories
When the COVID-19 pandemic began, one of the areas of science and research most affected was laboratory medicine. From developing tests that detect the virus, to testing for antibodies in patients who have recovered, Mayo Clinic Laboratories has been at the forefront of COVID-19 testing and research.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. William Morice II, president of Mayo Clinic Laboratories and chair of the department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic, explains how a reference lab works and how Mayo Clinic Laboratories quickly ramped up its testing capability to meet pandemic testing needs.

 
November 11, 2020
US tops 10 million cases of COVID-19
The U.S. reached the wrong kind of milestones this past week, reporting the 10 millionth coronavirus case and daily infection rates repeatedly topping the 100,000 mark. Cases of COVID-19 have been spiking for weeks as a third wave of infections spreads across the country.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses the growing number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. and across Europe, and what can be done to reverse the trends.

 
November 10, 2020
‘Movember’ movement raises prostate cancer awareness
After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men. In the U.S., 1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Prostate cancer that's detected early — when it's still confined to the prostate gland — has a better chance to be successfully treated, so it's important that men know their risk factors.

The "Movember" movement is encouraging men to grow a mustache in November to raise awareness of men's health issues, including prostate cancer.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Raymond Pak, a Mayo Clinic urologist, explains the guidelines for prostate screening and when to get a second opinion. Dr. Pak also shares the latest advances in treatment for prostate cancer.

 
November 09, 2020
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer
Pancreatic cancer tends to spread quickly and early detection is uncommon. For up to 50% of patients, at the time of their diagnosis, the cancer has spread outside the pancreas to other organs. Survival rates are typically 12 to 18 months, but there have been improvements in surgical techniques and chemotherapy.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Mark Truty, an oncology surgeon, and Dr. Santhi Swaroop Vege, a gastroenterologist, talk about treatment options, new chemotherapies, improving a patient's quality of life and the collaborative approach to team-based patient care at Mayo Clinic.

 
November 06, 2020
What to expect when children with congenital heart disease need surgery
Congential heart defects are the most common birth defect in the U.S., affecting approximately 1 in every 110 (about 40,000) babies each year. Some congenital heart defects in children are simple and don't need treatment. Other congenital heart defects are more complex and may require several surgeries performed over a period of several years.

This special edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Joining Dr. Mattke to discuss cardiovascular surgery is Dr. Elizabeth Stephens, a Mayo Clinic pediatric cardiovascular surgeon.

 
November 04, 2020
Mental health and coping during the pandemic
A recent survey conducted on behalf of the American Psychological Association found that nearly 80% of adults say that the coronavirus pandemic is a significant source of stress in their lives. In addition, 60% say that they are overwhelmed by the number of issues America faces, including health care, the economy, racism and political tensions. Now, the holidays are looming, a time of year that often brings heightened family and relationship stress. How can we better cope in these unsettling times?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Craig Sawchuk, the division chair of Integrated Behavioral Health at Mayo Clinic, discusses how to handle relationships and stress during the holidays and beyond.

 
November 03, 2020
Listener mailbag on COVID-19
Each week, the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast shares the latest information on COVID-19. On today's episode, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' coronavirus questions.

Dr. Poland discusses how to stay safe from the virus while exercising outdoors, whether temperature checks help screen for COVID-19, and how to deal with holiday travel and gatherings this year.

 
November 02, 2020
New book focuses on well-being and hope for dementia patients, caregivers
November is Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, raising awareness of the disease while recognizing the important work that caregivers do when caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's or dementia. The second edition of "Mayo Clinic on Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: A Guide for People With Dementia and Those Who Care for Them" answers many common questions, including:

When it comes to memory, what is typical aging? What is the difference between Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia? How can you keep your brain healthy?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, co-editors of the book, Dr. Jonathan Graff-Radford, a behavioral neurologist at Mayo Clinic, and Angela Lunde, an investigator in Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, highlight the book's focus on personal stories of those living with dementia and practical advice for caregivers.

 
October 30, 2020
Health disparity and effects of COVID-19 on racial, ethnic minorities
A recent Mayo Clinic study looked at the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on racial and ethnic minorities.

"We found that environmental factors, especially systemic racism and problems with housing density, predispose these patients to having more chances of infection," says Dr. Aditya Shah, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert and one of the authors of the study.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Shah explains the research findings and discusses how clinicians can help bring awareness to health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic and other public health emergencies.

 
October 29, 2020
Digital tools help Mayo Clinic with contact tracing
As positive cases of COVID-19 continue to spike across much of the country, the role of contact tracing to prevent further spread becomes more important.

Contact tracing is the process of notifying people who have had close contact with people newly infected with COVID-19, to let them know they may have been exposed. When it comes to contact tracing, quarantining and isolation, timing is critical to prevent further infections.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Laura Breeher, a preventive medicine specialist and medical director of Occupational Health Services at Mayo Clinic, explains how digital tools were developed at Mayo Clinic to aid in contact tracing.

 
October 28, 2020
CDC updates close contact guidelines
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its guidelines for defining close contact with a person who is positive for COVID-19. Previously, close contact was defined as occurring when someone was within 6 feet of an infectious person for 15 consecutive minutes. Now close contact includes people who were within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes over a 24-hour period, as the CDC now advises that repeated, brief encounters also carry a risk of transmission.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses the updated information from the CDC and the latest information from the Food and Drug Administration on COVID-19 treatments and vaccines.

 
October 26, 2020
How time changes affect our health
As most of America prepares to “fall back” and end daylight saving time, many people welcome the extra hour of sleep. But how do time changes affect the body and sleep patterns?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Lois Krahn, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and sleep medicine specialist, discusses daylight saving time and offers sleep hygiene tips for dealing with time and season changes.

 
October 23, 2020
Safe Halloween activities during the pandemic
Halloween is just around the corner. Usually, this means trick-or-treating, fall parties, and lots of candy and treats for children and families. But this year is different due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Halloween festivities need to be adapted to protect those who are most vulnerable and slow the spread of COVID-19.

This special edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode, which is hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Joining Dr. Mattke to discuss safe Halloween activities during the pandemic are Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious diseases physician at Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Kelsey Klaas, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

 
October 22, 2020
Resiliency during COVID-19 pandemic flu season
As the COVID pandemic continues and flu season begins, staying healthy and finding ways to improve your immunity is important.

"A resilient immune system is not just preventing, but constantly eliminating our exposures to background infections or inflammatory agents," says Dr. Anjali Bhagra, a Mayo Clinic integrative medicine specialist. "It allows your body to keep healing from inflammatory or infective triggers."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Bhagra, whose research focuses on resilience, talks about the ways to build your immune system and how resiliency practices can help you cope with illnesses this winter.

 
October 21, 2020
COVID-19 trials pause over safety concerns
The race to COVID-19 vaccines and treatments continues, with multiple clinical trials now in the final stages of testing. While the research is moving rapidly, it’s not without challenges. Two different trials were paused recently over potential safety concerns.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses current COVID-19 clinical trials. Dr. Poland also covers the possibility of reinfection with COVID-19, and the importance of getting a flu vaccination to protect yourself from influenza during the pandemic.

 
October 20, 2020
Clinical trial for ductal carcinoma in situ vaccine
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an early form of a non-invasive breast cancer that begins as abnormal cells inside the milk ducts in the breast. It typically doesn't show signs or symptoms and it's estimated that up to 40% of cases eventually become invasive if not treated.

The current standard treatment is to perform a lumpectomy or a mastectomy in more extreme cases. Clinical trials are underway to determine if some patients with ductal carcinoma in situ might be able to avoid surgery.

"In addition to considering proton therapy to target the cancer, Mayo Clinic is conducting a clinical trial that involves a vaccine that could boost immunity against the HER2 receptor," says Dr. Amy Degnim, a surgeon with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. "HER2 is a protein that in some cases is on the outside of cancer cells and for women with ductal carcinoma in situ, these receptors are present in about 50% to 60% of the cases."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Degnim, and one of her patients, Helen Gagoud, discuss receiving a ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosis and determining treatment, as well as the hopeful vaccine research at Mayo Clinic.

 
October 19, 2020
US coronavirus map — what do the trends mean for you?
As cases of COVID-19 rise in many areas of the U.S., it's important for people to have up-to-date information to protect themselves and their loved ones. Mayo Clinic has a tracking tool that features the latest COVID-19 data for every county in all 50 states, and Washington, D.C. The tool also features Mayo Clinic insight on how to assess risk and plan accordingly.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Henry Ting, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and health services researcher, discusses the COVID-19 tracking tool and other COVID-19 resources available from Mayo Clinic.

 
October 18, 2020
Mixed reality — where virtual reality and real life meet in the operating room
Mayo Clinic recently performed the first-ever shoulder arthroplasty procedure that used mixed reality technology in the United States. This technology provides surgeons with a 3D holographic view of the patient's preoperative plan, allowing the surgeon to visualize, rotate and interact with a surgical plan during the procedure.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, explains how mixed reality technology helps put the surgical plan into action.

Dr. Sanchez-Sotelo and Mayo Clinic have a financial interest in Wright Medical Group N.V., which developed the mixed reality technology.

 
October 17, 2020
COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program
After COVID-19 patients have recovered from the infection, some continue to have lingering effects from the disease, known as post-COVID syndrome. To help these patients, Mayo Clinic has launched the COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program. This program takes a multidisciplinary approach, including specialists in occupational medicine, pulmonary medicine, psychiatry and infectious diseases to treat persistent symptoms and help patients return to daily activities and work.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Greg Vanichkachorn, a Mayo Clinic preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine specialist who leads the program, discusses the symptoms of post-COVID syndrome and explains how the COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program helps people return to normal activity.

 
October 16, 2020
COVID-19 lung damage could lead to transplant
Severe lung damage has been a serious outcome for COVID-19 patients who survive and face recovery from the disease.

"As we know, lungs are one of the major organs that are involved with COVID infection," says Dr. Sadia Shah, a Mayo Clinic transplant pulmonologist and critical care physician. "In severe cases, the patient's lungs can be significantly inflamed from the disease, leading to pneumonia and scarring of the lungs, also known as pulmonary fibrosis." She says that, in the future, these are the patients who may need a lung transplant.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Shah talks about COVID-19 lung damage, the speculation there will be an increased need for lung transplants, and what improvements are being made in the field of lung transplantation.

 
October 15, 2020
Proper training can reduce the risk of ACL injury
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize the knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone, or femur, to your shinbone, or tibia. It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction, such as basketball, soccer, tennis and volleyball.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Matthew Crowe, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses ACL injury treatment options, including surgery and how proper training can reduce the risk of ACL injury.

 
October 14, 2020
FDA sets stricter standards for COVID-19 vaccine development
In an effort to reassure the public about the safety and effectiveness of a vaccine, the Food and Drug Administration has set stricter standardsfor COVID-19 vaccine development. These standards include following phase 3 clinical trial participants for at least two months, and having at least five severe COVID-19 cases in the placebo group. The agency's requirements are designed to ensure that there is adequate safety data on any vaccine before it is authorized for emergency use. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses vaccine development standards and shares concerns about the second wave of COVID-19 infections.
 
October 12, 2020
Increased alcohol use during the pandemic
According to an article in the journal JAMA Network Open, American adults report they are drinking 14% more often during the COVID-19 pandemic. While the research didn't determine why drinking frequency has increased, health experts worry that people are turning to alcohol to cope with the stress, anxiety, and isolation caused by the pandemic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Victor Karpyak, a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and addiction researcher, discusses alcohol use and the warning signs that drinking may be a problem.

 
October 11, 2020
Kids and sports during COVID-19
Children benefit from social interaction, and participating in sports activities is one way to spend time with peers. It's a chance to exercise and learn socialization skills.

"But most sports require close contact, and during the COVID-19 pandemic, this is creating a dilemma," says Dr. David Soma, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Soma discusses risks and benefits of youth sports during the pandemic and offers suggestions to minimize the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

 
October 10, 2020
Quality Academy
Mayo Clinic's Quality Academy was created in 2006 to deliver effective and cohesive quality improvement education across Mayo. The Quality Academy now offers more than 20 different courses for both individuals and teams. Now the Quality Academy is expanding its offerings beyond Mayo Clinic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Quality Academy leaders Dr. Nneka Comfere, medical director; Barbara Jordan, administrator; and Jolene Anderson-Rau, operations manager, discuss how the Quality Academy is delivering quality improvement in health care.

 
October 09, 2020
Integrative women’s health
Integrative health care for women encompasses a wide range of health issues, beyond what people might think are the usual areas of concern.

Women's health generally focuses on breast health and gynecological health, but Dr. Jackie Thielen, an internal medicine physician with the Women's Health Specialty Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida, says women respond differently to other illnesses than men.

Dr. Thielen says, "Women are simply not a smaller version of men, and they may experience illnesses differently." She says arthritic diseases or endocrine issues, even cancers, are different because of genetics, and how women's hormones and bodies work.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Thielen discusses why integrative health care is so important for women.

 
October 08, 2020
Stay up to date on routine vaccinations
Pediatricians and family physicians are alerting parents that it’s important to keep their children up to date on routine vaccinations, whether or not children attend in-person school. "We’ve had a number of difficulties with the COVID-19 pandemic that actually resulted in children missing months of well-child visits in which routine vaccines were given," says Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jacobson discusses childhood vaccinations and the extra importance of getting a flu vaccination this year during the pandemic.

 
October 07, 2020
How do antiviral drugs work?
Antiviral drugs are medicines that fight against viruses in your body by impeding the infection process. Antivirals are commonly used to treat HIV/AIDS, influenza, herpes, and hepatitis B and C. The antiviral, Remdesivir, which was originally developed to fight Ebola, is now being used to treat COVID-19.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, explains how antivirals work to shorten the course of the disease.

 
October 06, 2020
Managing COVID-19 inpatients
While most people who contract COVID-19 will be able to manage symptoms and recover at home, there are some who have a more severe course of the disease and need to be hospitalized. Physicians and scientists have learned a lot about COVID-19 in the first nine months of the pandemic, and that new knowledge is improving treatments for patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Raymund Razonable, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist, discusses management of hospitalized patients with COVID-19, including therapeutics available to treat COVID-19.

 
October 05, 2020
Remote monitoring of COVID-19 patients
When patients are diagnosed with COVID-19, they are required to self-isolate until the infection is cleared. Some patients will be at risk for complications, and may need comprehensive support at home. Providing that support is the goal of Mayo Clinic's remote patient monitoring team.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Ryan T. Hurt, a Mayo Clinic general internal medicine specialist, explains how remote monitoring benefits patients. Dr. Hurt helped form the team that manages positive COVID-19 test results at Mayo Clinic in Rochester and the Mayo Clinic Health System.

 
October 02, 2020
Dual surgery safe and effective for polycystic kidney disease
A new study from Mayo Clinic, published in the American Journal of Transplantation, found that patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) can have dual surgery safely. This means patients with large polycystic kidneys in need of a kidney transplant can have their diseased kidneys safely removed at the same time as their transplant surgery, instead of having two separate procedures.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Mikel Prieto, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon and senior author of the study, explains the results of the study and the benefits of dual surgery for PKD.

 
October 01, 2020
Different options for breast cancer screening
During the COVID-19 pandemic, women have reportedly skipped or delayed their regular breast cancer screenings. This may lead to a surge in breast cancer diagnoses in the months ahead. That's according to a study in JAMA.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Dr. Katie Hunt, a Mayo Clinic radiologist, says it's the perfect time to make sure women are up to date on their breast cancer screenings.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Hunt discusses a variety of recommendations for screening and encourages women not to miss the window of opportunity to catch breast cancer early.

 
September 30, 2020
‘COVID fatigue’ fueling a rise in cases
With the COVID-19 pandemic entering a tenth month, experts says adherence to public health measures appears to be waning in some parts of the country. "COVID fatigue," meaning failing to comply with masking, hand hygiene and physical distancing guidelines, has fueled a resurgence in COVID-19 cases in more than half of the U.S. states.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses the rising number of COVID-19 cases and how vaccine experts in science and industry are working together in unprecedented ways.

 
September 29, 2020
Transplant surgeries and COVID-19
Transplants are identified as non-elective surgeries, and transplant patients have faced urgent medical needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Our practice, like many others across the country, did slow down in March and April of this year," says Dr. Patrick Dean, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon. "Patients and providers were concerned ― appropriately so ― about what would happen with this pandemic and whether it would be safe to have a transplant or for that matter any health care that wasn't absolutely emergent."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Dean talks about taking care of transplant patients; overcoming surgery challenges during the pandemic; the increased risks transplant patients have of developing SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, because of compromised immune systems; and the important need for COVID-19 testing.

 
September 28, 2020
Mayo Clinic Platform aims to create new care delivery possibilities
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the use of digital health care, with telemedicine playing a big role in treating patients during the pandemic. But telemedicine appointments are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to changing the way health care will be delivered in the future.

Mayo Clinic Platform is a collection of initiatives focused on transforming health care by using technology, big data and artificial intelligence to make connections. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. John Halamka, president of Mayo Clinic Platform, explains how the platform initiatives are meeting patient needs and creating new care delivery possibilities.

 
September 25, 2020
Time for your flu vaccine
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it’s more important than ever to get a flu vaccine this year to keep people healthy and not overload the health care system. While a flu vaccine won't protect against COVID-19, flu vaccines will reduce your risk of flu illness, hospitalization and death.

"You need to get the flu vaccine at least two weeks prior to the onset of flu activity in your region," says Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. On this edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Sampathkumar discusses who should get a flu vaccine and when.

 
September 23, 2020
How flu vaccines can help in COVID-19 fight
With fall approaching and winter just around the corner, many are wondering how COVID-19 will affect this flu season. Some experts warn of a “twindemic,” with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the onset of influenza overlapping here in the Northern Hemisphere. To keep people healthy and not overload the health care system, experts say getting a flu vaccine this year is more important than ever.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, discusses flu vaccinations and shares some good news from the Southern Hemisphere's flu season.

 
September 21, 2020
Protecting yourself from wildfire smoke
With wildfires burning in the western U.S., smoke is affecting air quality for hundreds of miles. Wildfire smoke can irritate the eyes and respiratory system, and also can be dangerous for the elderly and people with heart and lung conditions.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic, discusses the health risks of breathing in wildfire smoke and what you can do to protect yourself.

 
September 18, 2020
#AskTheMayoMom about COVID-19, school children
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to create challenges, including returning to school with hybrid learning modules for children. There are also anxieties and uncertainties to navigate, while trying to follow COVID-19 guidelines.

In this "Mayo Clinic Q&A" podcast, Dr. Angela Mattke, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and host of #AskTheMayoMom, talks about the concerns her patients have, and what important things parents and caregivers should take into consideration when helping children stay healthy.

 
September 16, 2020
Bringing COVID-19 vaccines to the public
Once a vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is approved, there will be logistics to consider. For example, who will receive the vaccine first, and how can the supply chain safely deliver the vaccine to 330 million Americans and potentially more than 7 billion people worldwide? In addition, multiple vaccines may be brought to market within weeks to months of each other, confusing consumers.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, explains the challenges of rolling out a COVID-19 vaccine.

 
September 14, 2020
Advanced Care at Home
Using a new technology platform, Mayo Clinic recently began a new care model called Advanced Care at Home. Some patients with conditions that were previously managed in the hospital will now have the option to be treated and monitored from the comfort of their own home.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Michael Maniaci, chair of the Division Hospital Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses the benefits of the new Advanced Care at Home platform. Dr. Maniaci leads the Advanced Care at Home program in Florida.

 
September 11, 2020
Physician shares his experience battling COVID-19
Dr. Deepi Goyal, a Mayo Clinic emergency physician and regional chair of practice for Southeastern Minnesota, was infected with COVID-19 after his daughter was exposed at work and brought the virus home. Despite his best efforts to isolate and avoid contact, Dr. Goyal started experiencing COVID-19 symptoms on day nine of the recommended 10-day isolation period.

On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Goyal shares his experience battling COVID-19 and offers tips for being prepared to quarantine at home when necessary.

 
September 08, 2020
Don’t delay cancer screenings
Cancer diagnoses have decreased since the COVID-19 pandemic began, according to a recent study in JAMA.

"We can speculate that putting off routine screening tests means early cancers are not being detected," says Dr. Nabil Wasif, a Mayo Clinic surgical oncologist. He says this suggests that patients will eventually show up but with more advanced cancer.

Routine screenings are recommended for breast, cervical and colon cancer, as well as lung cancer if the patient is a smoker.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Wasif, says patients are taking a risk by delaying screening.

 
September 04, 2020
Children, COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome
Children can become ill with COVID-19, and sometimes they develop a rare but serious reaction called multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). When this reaction happens, different body parts become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, intestinal tract and brain. More than 600 cases of MIS-C have been reported in the U.S. as of Aug. 20, most in minority populations.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Emily Levy, a pediatric critical care and infectious diseases expert, gives an overview of MIS-C, including its similarities with Kawasaki disease.

 
September 02, 2020
How do vaccines work?
Vaccines are at the forefront of daily news about COVID-19. Vaccines help prevent diseases that can be dangerous or even deadly by working with the body’s immune system. But how exactly do vaccines work?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, gives an overview of vaccines, including the different types of vaccines and how you can make sure you are up to date with all recommended vaccinations.

 
August 31, 2020
Heart muscle damage from COVID-19
From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was that known the disease affected the lungs. But some of the most severe damage to the body can be to the heart muscle. COVID-related myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle, can cause severe damage and sometimes death.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Leslie Cooper, chair of Cardiology at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses how COVID-19 affects the heart in hospitalized patients, in young people and he identifies areas of research that need to be pursued in the near future.

 
August 28, 2020
From the front lines of the COVID-19 battle
Health care workers across the country have been on the front lines fighting the coronavirus for more than six months. COVID-19 has presented extraordinary challenges in treating patients and helping families cope, and those challenges are taking a toll on the health care workers themselves.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Ayan Sen, chair of Critical Care Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, shares his experiences managing patients and supporting staff during the pandemic.

 
August 26, 2020
Listener mailbag – COVID-19 questions answered
During the COVID-19 pandemic, new information about the disease is discovered on a weekly basis and it can be hard to keep up. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' questions on COVID-19.

Does hand sanitizer expire? Is a face shield effective in protecting me from the virus? How long do I need to quarantine if I've been exposed? Get answers to these questions and more on today's episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A.

 
August 24, 2020
Strategic Management and Resource Team helps keep patients safe during COVID-19
In an effort to see patients safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayo Clinic developed a Strategic Management and Resource Team, also known as a SMaRT team, to help institute safety measures like universal masking, expanded cleaning protocols and use of virtual visits.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. A. Noelle Larson, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic who serves as her department's SMaRT representative, explains how orthopedic surgery is safely seeing patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Larson also discusses her practice, including the vertebral body tether implant, an innovative treatment for some patients with moderate to severe scoliosis.

 
August 21, 2020
Study finds link between hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, menopausal hot flashes
A study recently conducted at Mayo Clinic found that women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy were more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and hot flashes are both linked to heart disease risk.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Stephanie Faubion, the study's lead author, will discuss the key takeaways from the study and explain where more research is needed. Dr. Faubion is the Penny and Bill George Director for Mayo Clinic's Center for Women's Health.

 
August 19, 2020
Strict adherence to public health measures effective in combating COVID-19
Until a vaccine is developed, public health measures are the best defense against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These measures include masking, hand hygiene and physical distancing. "Strict adherence to those things is a very powerful antidote to this virus," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest news on COVID-19, including what has been learned about herd immunity and contact tracing, as well as the effectiveness of different types of masks.

 
August 17, 2020
Using AI to determine heart failure diagnosis
When people seek emergency care for shortness of breath, it can be challenging to determine the cause. A new Mayo Clinic study found that using an EKG enhanced by artificial intelligence (AI) is better than standard blood tests at determining if the shortness of breath is caused by heart failure.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Demilade Adedinsewo, lead author of the study and chief fellow in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses how AI is improving patient care in the emergency department.

 
August 14, 2020
The importance of a healthy mindset to start the school year
The start of a new school year is always a time that’s filled with excitement and anxiety. This year, COVID-19 is making back to school even more challenging for kids, teachers and parents. Whether in person, online or a hybrid approach, this school year will be different for students and staff. How can you and your child have a healthy mindset for this school year?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Craig Sawchuk, chair of the Division of Integrated Behavioral Health at Mayo Clinic, shares helpful tips and strategies to be resilient and handle the challenges of a school year during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
August 12, 2020
What is viral shedding?
When a person is infected with a virus, the virus multiplies in the body and can be released into the environment through sneezing, coughing or even speaking. This release is called "shedding" and viral shedding is how COVID-19 is spread from person to person. How long a person who has COVID-19 will shed virus is still unknown.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses viral shedding and why asymptomatic carriers of COVID-19 are a big concern.

 
August 10, 2020
Back-to-school recommendations
Whether in person, online or a hybrid model of education, families and school districts are planning for how to safely teach students during the COVID-19 pandemic. No matter which plan is chosen by communities, this school year will be challenging.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic, discusses how students, teachers and staff can use public health measures already in place to minimize the risk of exposure to the virus and reduce community spread of COVID-19.

 
August 07, 2020
Will there be an at-home test for COVID-19?
Last week, the Food and Drug Administration paved the way for commercial developers to create at-home COVID-19 tests. While no test is yet approved for home use, a fast and cheap test could encourage people to test themselves routinely before going to work or school. Real-time results would enable infected people to self-quarantine right away, keeping asymptomatic people from infecting others. "It fits with the modeling that’s been done where if you can test frequently enough that you could actually start to dampen down, if people would quarantine, you could dampen down cases. And that, as you know, would be huge," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the science behind at-home testing for COVID-19. Dr. Poland also shares the status of vaccine research trials, including how healthy adults can enroll in the COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

 
August 05, 2020
Bone marrow transplant
A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood-forming stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or diseased bone marrow. Bone marrow transplants may use cells from your own body (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). Bone marrow transplants can benefit people with a variety of both cancerous (malignant) and noncancerous (benign) diseases.

On this episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A, Dr. William Hogan, director of the Mayo Clinic Bone Marrow Transplant program, discusses bone marrow transplant.

 
August 03, 2020
Delegate, delete, do — How to integrate work, home life
During the COVID-19 pandemic, teleworking has become a way of life for many. As the physical boundaries between work and home blur, work-life balance can be a challenge.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Adam Perlman, director of Integrative Health and Wellness at Mayo Clinic in Florida, offers helpful strategies for managing daily stresses during COVID-19. One plan of action? Delegate, delete, and do.

 
July 29, 2020
Cancer Center patient navigators
Cancer. It's a word that nobody wants to hear. It's a difficult diagnosis that can leave you and your family members scared and confused. Finding guidance along the journey can help.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Jeri Lensing and Angela Young discuss the important role of patient navigators at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

 
July 24, 2020
COVID-19 update with Dr. Greg Poland
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland gives an update on progress towards a vaccine for COVID-19, discusses therapies for treating the virus and shares research on how effective face masks and physical distancing are in fighting the spread of the disease.

 
July 22, 2020
Telemedicine in the emergency department
During the COVID-pandemic, we've heard a lot about telemedicine. While still a relatively new concept, advances in technology have made telemedicine a reality in hospitals, clinics, even the E-R.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, emergency room physician Dr. Christopher Russi and physician assistant Erin Mason will explain how Mayo Clinic is using telemedicine in the emergency department.

 
July 15, 2020
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a birth defect that affects normal blood flow through the heart. As a baby develops during pregnancy, the left side of the heart does not form correctly. Ava Weitl, now a first grader, was born with HLHS. She had her first heart surgery the day she was born. Now she is part of pioneering research at Mayo Clinic.

On this episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A, Ava and Dr. Timothy Nelson, director of the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome at Mayo Clinic, will share her story.

 
July 08, 2020
An alert for women about heart disease
Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S. Chest pain is a common symptom, but it's often not the only one, and understanding the wide-ranging symptoms of heart disease becomes more important as a woman ages. What is a woman's best defense against heart disease?

Dr. Rekha Mankad, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, discusses women’s heart health — this week on Mayo Clinic Q&A.

 
July 01, 2020
How artificial intelligence is revealing physiological age
The heart doesn’t lie, and you may be surprised to learn that your heart can even reveal your physiological age. Artificial intelligence (AI) applied to an EKG can now measure your body's health.

On the debut episode of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Paul Friedman and Dr. Suraj Kapa — both Mayo Clinic cardiologists —explain how your body's age might differ from what's on your birth certificate.

 
June 24, 2020
The living-kidney donation option
While 6,000 people chose living-kidney donation in 2018, experts say the pool of potential donors is still untapped. Educating would-be donors and recipients about the advantages of living donation is key.

Dr. Mikel Prieto, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon, discusses the living kidney donation option.

 
June 17, 2020
Cancer and nutrition
When it comes to fighting cancer or living with a cancer diagnosis, does what you eat make a difference? Nutrition is an important thing to consider for people with cancer. Eating healthy foods before, during, and after treatment can help patients feel better and stay stronger.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A, Dr. John Shin, a hematologist and oncologist, discusses nutrition and cancer.

 
June 15, 2020
Why it's critical for children to get their routine health care
The COVID-19 pandemic has put a hold on many activities. But one thing that shouldn't fall by the wayside is your child's health.

On this episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious disease specialist, discusses the importance of routine checkups, including keeping up with vaccination schedules.

 
June 10, 2020
Medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic
Across the world, one of the biggest changes forced by the COVID-19 pandemic is in the field of education. Programs from kindergarten through postsecondary have rapidly moved to a distance learning model. Online and remote instruction has its own unique challenges, and has required students and educators to be creative to stay connected.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Alexandra Wolanskyj-Spinner, senior associate dean for student affairs at the Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in Minnesota, discusses medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
June 09, 2020
Precautions for a summer of COVID-19
With the onset of warmer weather and more and more states loosening their COVID-19 restrictions, lots of folks are wondering about some summer staples, like cookouts and a day at the beach or pool.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, an infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic, discusses how you can minimize your risk during common summertime scenarios.

 
June 03, 2020
How information technology helps in the COVID-19 response
During to the COVID-19 pandemic, teleworking and distance learning has become a necessity. The new normal means many people needed technology to do their jobs, and that is certainly true at Mayo Clinic. Information technology (IT) has aided Mayo Clinic during the pandemic in two significant ways. One, thousands of employees moved out of their offices and into their homes to work. And two, patients now more than ever are being seen by their health care providers using video visits and tele-health.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Mark Henderson, division chair of IT at Mayo Clinic, discusses how IT has aided in the COVID-19 response.

 
June 02, 2020
Expedited breast cancer treatment
During the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing that hasn’t stopped is the need for cancer treatment. While patients might be hesitant to leave their homes for weeks at a time for treatment, there is a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic for some breast cancer patients. Certain low-risk breast cancer patients can now complete their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tina Hieken, a Mayo Clinic surgeon, explains how the expedited treatment program combines a pathologist's mid-surgery confirmation that the cancer has not spread, with a type of partial breast radiation called brachytherapy.

 
May 28, 2020
Health and Human Services plays key role in supporting Americans amid COVID-19 crisis
The COVID-19 pandemic has been a unique situation that has required work across federal and state agencies to support communities and frontline workers during this challenging time. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has played a key role by providing effective health and human services and fostering advances in medicine, public health and social services during the COVID-19 crisis.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Eric Hargan, HHS deputy secretary, discusses the ways the department is supporting Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
May 27, 2020
What we know about virus transmission
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common mode of transmission for COVID-19 is through close contact from person to person. While it is possible that someone can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or possibly their eyes, this isn’t thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses virus transmission and steps to take to keep yourself safe.

 
May 26, 2020
Hospital safety during COVID-19
While many nonessential businesses closed or suspended operations during the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals continued to operate and take care of COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. How have Mayo Clinic hospitals navigated the pandemic and kept patients and staff safe?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Robert Cima, chair of hospital practice at Mayo Clinic, explains Mayo Clinic's efforts to maintain safety and how staff has risen to the challenge of practicing medicine during a pandemic.

 
May 22, 2020
Understanding COVID19 testing
Mayo Clinic has been a leader in developing and deploying testing for COVID-19, but understanding the different types of tests and what they measure can be confusing. Terms like viral, molecular, serology and antibodies aren’t clear for everyone. What are the different COVID-19 tests, and what do they do?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Bobbi Pritt, chair of the Division of Clinical Microbiology at Mayo Clinic, explains testing options for COVID-19.

 
May 21, 2020
Convalescent plasma therapy
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Government is supporting a national Expanded Access Program to collect and provide convalescent plasma to patients in need across the country (uscovidplasma.org). Convalescent plasma refers to blood plasma collected from people who have recovered from COVID-19. That plasma, which contains antibodies against the virus, is then used to treat others with advanced illness. Working collaboratively with industry, academic and government partners, Mayo Clinic is serving as the lead institution for the program.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Philippe Bauer, site principal investigator for Mayo Clinic in Rochester, discusses the COVID-19 convalescent plasma program.

 
May 20, 2020
COVID-19 update
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland reviews the latest literature on COVID-19, discusses vaccine trials and explains some unique symptoms of COVID-19.

 
May 19, 2020
Ethnic disparities and COVID-19
As COVID-19 continues to take hundreds of lives each day in the U.S., public health officials say minorities are being affected disproportionately. Early data shows that African Americans and other U.S. ethnic minorities have contracted COVID-19 at a higher rate and experience greater sickness and a higher death rate than other Americans.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Irene Sia, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert, and Dr. Mark Wieland, a Mayo Clinic community internal medicine physician, discuss ethnic disparities and COVID-19, including research being done with the Rochester Healthy Community Partnership.

 
May 14, 2020
Surgical practice during COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic forced elective surgeries to be delayed while hospitals prepared for the potential influx of COVID-19 patients. Thanks to effective efforts to flatten the curve and the lifting of executive stay-at-home orders, Mayo Clinic is again able to see patients for elective surgeries. What’s different for patients when having surgery during the coronavirus era? And what extra steps is Mayo Clinic taking to keep patients and staff safe?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Michael Kendrick, chair of the Department of Surgery at Mayo Clinic, explains how surgical practice remains safe in the time of COVID-19.

 
May 13, 2020
Mayo Clinic expands in-person care
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals and clinics were forced to postpone nonessential appointments and surgeries in March and April. Thanks to social distancing and executive stay-at-home orders which helped flatten the curve of the COVID-19 outbreak, Mayo Clinic is prepared now, not only to meet the projected needs of COVID-19 patients, but safely treat patients whose care was delayed, and to welcome new patients as well.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Conor Loftus, chair of outpatient practice at Mayo Clinic, explains how Mayo Clinic is protecting patients and staff by using enhanced screening, testing, cleaning and masking protocols.

 
May 12, 2020
COVID-19 news briefing
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses how the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, is changing, and how scientists and researchers are rapidly gaining new knowledge about the virus and the disease that it causes.

 
May 11, 2020
COVID-19 research at Mayo Clinic
Thanks to its combination of practice, education, and research, Mayo Clinic has a strong foundation to respond quickly to a medical crisis such as COVID-19. As the SARS-CoV-2 virus spread worldwide, a research task force was formed at Mayo Clinic to review and approve research proposals related to the virus and the disease it causes.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Andrew Badley, chair of Mayo Clinic’s COVID-19 research task force, gives an update on COVID-19 research activities at Mayo Clinic.

 
May 08, 2020
How to clean during COVID-19
Spring has sprung, and, for many, spring cleaning is a ritual. During the COVID-19 pandemic, cleaning and disinfecting homes is more important than ever. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new cleaning guidelines to help effectively fight COVID-19 as businesses, schools and public spaces reopen.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert, discusses effective cleaning tactics to combat coronavirus.

 
May 07, 2020
The “Quarantine 15”
It’s being called the "Quarantine 15" online — people poking fun at gaining weight while staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Is it really a problem? Or does eating help cope with stress? And what about for kids? Public health researchers warn that COVID-19 related school closures will double out-of-school time this year, raising concerns about weight gain associated with summer recess for children.

On this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Donald Hensrud, director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, discusses tips for healthy eating and exercising while staying at home.

 
May 05, 2020
Possible neurological effects of COVID-19
Originally identified as a respiratory disease, some COVID-19 patients exhibit neurologic symptoms including stroke, loss of consciousness, headache, and even the loss of taste and smell. What's unknown is whether these are direct effects of the virus entering the nervous system, or consequences of the disease's effect on the body.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Allen Aksamit Jr., a Mayo Clinic neurologist, discusses potential neurological effects of COVID-19.

 
May 01, 2020
Maintaining routine vaccine schedules during COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the World Health Organization (WHO) says more than 117 million children in 37 countries may be missing out on the lifesaving measles vaccine. The WHO had issued some guidelines to help countries sustain immunization activities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tina Ardon, a Mayo Clinic family medicine physician, discusses the importance of childhood vaccinations. Dr. Ardon also discusses masking guidelines for children during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
April 30, 2020
COVID-19 questions answered
On today's episode, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' coronavirus questions. Topics include: pets and COVID-19, ultraviolet light and viruses, and herd immunity.
 
April 29, 2020
Respiratory therapists play critical role in treating COVID-19 patients
COVID-19 was first identified late last year with a cluster of pneumonia cases caused by a new coronavirus. The COVID-19 disease process heavily affects the respiratory system, and patients often need oxygen support. The respiratory therapist plays a critical role in managing oxygen levels, placing breathing tubes, and managing the mechanical ventilator, when necessary.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Daniel Diedrich, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist and critical care physician, discusses the role of the respiratory therapist from the time a patient presents with COVID-19 all the way through that patient's discharge.

 
April 28, 2020
Using Tele-ICU to support New York hospital
Using tele-ICU capabilities, Mayo Clinic physicians in critical care medicine are volunteering to support staff at New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, which has been inundated with COVID-19 cases. At this unprecedented time, these two organizations are collaborating and innovating to help patients.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Sean Caples, a Mayo Clinic pulmonologist and critical care physician, describes the real-time connectivity for Mayo physicians to provide assistance from anywhere directly to the New York-Presbyterian Lawrence ICU. At the same time, Mayo doctors are drawing on the experience gained by New York-Presbyterian Lawrence providers in caring for patients with COVID-19 and its complications.

 
April 27, 2020
Skin care for your hands, face during COVID-19
Your best defense against the spread of coronavirus is hand-washing, but frequent hand-washing can deplete the skin of its natural moisture and oils, causing dry and cracked skin. Recommendations to wear face masks also are taking a toll on the skin. Face masks may rub across the nose and behind the ears, which can irritate the skin. What should you do if your skin is becoming dry or sensitive?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, shares tips to care for your skin affected by frequent hand-washing or face masks.

 
April 24, 2020
Abuse at home – safety planning during COVID-19
People around the world have been under stay-at-home orders to prevent the spread of coronavirus. While this situation isn't ideal, it can be dangerous for some. For people in abusive situations, home may not be a safe environment.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Amanda Kubista Owen, a Mayo Clinic social worker, discusses services available to help support people affected by domestic violence and why having a safety plan is important.

 
April 23, 2020
COVID-19 News Briefing with Dr. Greg Poland
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses current outbreak numbers, why there may be a second wave of infections, and research on a vaccine.

 
April 22, 2020
COVID-19 research task force
As the SARS-CoV-2 virus spread worldwide, a race began to develop testing protocols and ramp up research. Mayo Clinic's COVID-19 research task force is studying the virus, predicting hot spots, and working towards effective treatments and a vaccine.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Andrew Badley, chair of Mayo Clinic’s COVID-19 research task force, gives an update on COVID-19 research activities at Mayo Clinic.

 
April 21, 2020
How public health measures can help reopen the country
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, efforts are underway to find a new normal and begin to re-open the country and the economy. While people are eager for strict social distancing rules to end, public health measures, including testing and tracing for the virus, will be important tools needed to control the spread of the virus and prevent an uptick in new infections.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses the steps needed to reopen businesses, schools and other activities as the fight to control COVID-19 continues.

 
April 20, 2020
Mayo Clinic Laboratories launches serology testing
A new serology test from Mayo Clinic Laboratories is being used to identify the presence of immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The serology test is intended only to detect antibodies to the virus. It does not diagnose recent or active infection. Mayo Clinic Laboratories also offers a molecular test to diagnose very recent or active infection. Both tests are important tools in the pandemic response.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Elitza Theel, director of Mayo Clinic’s Infectious Diseases Serology Laboratory, explains why serology testing is initially focused on identifying people in areas where potential immunity is key, including front-line health care workers.

 
April 17, 2020
Managing stress and anxiety during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced changes to daily life, and disrupted normal routines at work, at school, and at home. Physical isolation can negatively affect mental health, and constant news coverage can bring fear and anxiety about the disease. How can you best cope in these uncertain times?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Craig Sawchuk, chair of the Division of Integrated Behavioral Health at Mayo Clinic, shares helpful tips and strategies on managing stress and anxiety during the pandemic.

 
April 15, 2020
Critical care units prepare for COVID-19
An intensive care unit (ICU) is a special unit in a hospital where patients who are very ill can be under constant supervision by their health care team. The COVID-19 pandemic has stressed ICU and critical care units in hot spots where the virus had spread widely.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Daniel Brown, director of critical care medicine at Mayo Clinic, discusses how critical care units have prepared for COVID-19.

 
April 14, 2020
Understanding COVID-19 testing
There are two types of tests for COVID-19, and it is important to understand the difference. The first type, a diagnostic test, is used to find out if you are actively infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19. This test typically is done as a nasal swab. The second type of test is a serologic test to determine if you had a recent infection of SARS-CoV-2 and now have antibodies against the virus. This test is done through a blood sample.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, explains the need for two different tests and how they will help move recovery from the pandemic forward.

 
April 13, 2020
Emergency medicine in the time of COVID-19
Emergency medicine is a specialty that prides itself on a mantra: anyone, anything, anytime. The COVID-19 pandemic has put emergency health care providers and first responders on the front lines, fighting the spread of the virus and caring for critically ill patients.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Annie Sadosty, a Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician, discusses when patients should come to the emergency room, how to safely care for people with COVID-19, and how teams at Mayo Clinic are collaborating during the pandemic.

 
April 10, 2020
Pregnancy during the COVID-19 pandemic
COVID-19 is the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Because SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus, researchers are still learning how the virus affects the body. And this raises questions for pregnant women. Can COVID-19 affect pregnancy? Is breastfeeding safe? How can a pregnant woman protect herself from the disease?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist, will discuss COVID-19 and pregnancy.

 
April 09, 2020
Pandemic news briefing with Dr. Poland
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses why the U.S. has reached its deadliest week during the pandemic, and how clinical trials and vaccine research are underway to prevent future outbreaks.

 
April 08, 2020
Cardiac risks of off-label drugs to treat COVID-19
A study published recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings details information about potential cardiac side effects when using off-label drugs to treat COVID-19. Off-label means the drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat a different condition. Some of the off-label drugs being used to treat COVID-19 have a risk of sudden cardiac arrest and death.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Michael Ackerman, a Mayo Clinic genetic cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory, explains how heart monitoring is important to identify at-risk patients.

 
April 07, 2020
CDC recommends wearing cloth masks in public
To prevent the spread of COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that Americans wear wearing cloth masks in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. The CDC considers cloth masks an additional, voluntary public health measure.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic COVID-19 expert, explains the difference between medical masking and public masking, and discusses the proper way to put a mask on and off to prevent the spread of disease.

 
April 06, 2020
COVID-19 update with Dr. Gregory Poland
On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses antibody testing, immunity, and how the scientific and research communities are collaborating to fight this disease.

 
April 02, 2020
The ‘unprecedented challenge’ of fighting COVID-19
The ongoing fight against the COVID-19 pandemic has heavily burdened front-line health care providers. "Our nation and our medical community is facing an unprecedented challenge," says Dr. Elie Berbari, chair of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Mayo Clinic.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Berbari discusses how Mayo Clinic is minimizing exposure to staff, while providing safe and compassionate care to patients.

 
March 31, 2020
How does SARS-CoV-2 make people sick?
A novel coronavirus is a new strain that has not been seen before in humans. SARS-Co-V2 is a novel virus, causing the disease COVID-19. Because COVID-19 is a new disease, much is still being learned about how it spreads and the severity of illness it causes.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, infectious disease expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, explains the science behind how the virus makes people sick, and what the virus does to the body. Dr. Poland will also discuss the latest information on clinical trials and vaccine research to fight the disease outbreak.

 
March 27, 2020
Point-of-care manufacturing to help fight COVID-19
When it comes to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayo Clinic is relying not only on clinicians, but also engineers. Supply chain management and manufacturing capabilities are being readied to help in the fight against COVID-19.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jonathan Morris, co-director of Mayo Clinic's 3D Anatomic Modeling Lab, and Mark Wehde, chair of Mayo Clinic's Division of Engineering, discuss personal protective equipment and mobilizing the manufacturing sector to help in the fight.

 
March 26, 2020
Dr. Poland answers listeners’ COVID-19 questions
Each day, the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic.

On today's episode, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' coronavirus questions.

 
March 25, 2020
Get healthy, stay healthy adhering to social distancing
As people follow recommendations to stay home and practice social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, questions arise as to how to pass the time. There may be things you can do to help get and stay healthy.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Elizabeth Cozine, a Mayo Clinic family medicine physician, highlights the importance of eating well, exercising daily, and getting enough sleep to stay well while being stuck at home.

 
March 24, 2020
The latest on COVID-19
On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses the importance of testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19; work being done on antiviral medications; and how long social distancing might need to last.

 
March 23, 2020
Mental health and coping during COVID-19 crisis
Continuous news coverage about the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic is creating worry and anxiety for people across the globe. How can you be better prepared to cope with the crisis?

On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Beth Rush, a Mayo Clinic neuropsychologist, shares ideas for taking care of your mental health and finding comfort amid the uncertainty.

 
March 20, 2020
Infectious diseases expert answers COVID-19 (coronavirus) questions
The information about the COVID-19 pandemic changes rapidly, and it's hard to stay up to date with the latest information. On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, answers COVID-19 questions.

Dr. Poland discusses preventive measures to stop the spread of the virus, what to do if you do get sick, and the potential for effective treatments and a vaccine.

 
March 19, 2020
The importance of isolation to flatten the curve on COVID-19 (coronavirus)
In epidemiology, the idea of slowing a virus' spread so that fewer people need to seek treatment at any given time is known as "flattening the curve." It's a phrase you've likely heard in the news, and it is an important goal for governments and health care leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of Mayo Clinic's Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine, explains how isolation can stop a spike in the number of new coronavirus cases.

 
March 18, 2020
Long-term care facilities take precautions against COVID-19 (coronavirus)
Long-term care facilities are taking steps to prepare and respond to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. With guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, long-term care facilities are restricting visitors in most cases.

On this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Brandon Verdoorn, a Mayo Clinic geriatrician and medical director of Charter House, a continuing care retirement community affiliated with Mayo Clinic in Rochester, explains how staff are taking steps to keep residents safe and prevent spread of the coronavirus.

 
March 17, 2020
Blood donations plummet during COVID-19 pandemic
With recommendations to stay home during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. now has a critical blood shortage. Blood donation collections have plummeted due to canceled blood drives and concerns about being out in the community. Almost half of U.S. blood collectors are reporting that they only have a two-day supply or less of blood products.

On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Justin Kreuter, transfusion medicine specialist with the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center, explains how new blood donors are needed to step up and fill the void.

 
March 16, 2020
Protect Yourself from COVID-19
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a Mayo Clinic pediatric infectious diseases specialist, gives helpful tips to protect yourself from COVID-19. Hand-washing, social distancing and respiratory etiquette all play a part in stopping the spread of coronavirus.
 
March 11, 2020
Vaccine expert's advice on COVID-19
This week’s episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A separates fact from fiction on COVID-19 (coronavirus).

Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses who is at risk, how to stay protected from the virus, and, if there will be a coronavirus vaccine in the future.

 
March 04, 2020
Gamma Knife Radiosurgery
Gamma knife radiosurgery is surgery without a scalpel. The procedure combines radiation oncology and neurosurgery to treat lesions in the brain, including tumors.

Among the upsides, there's no incision in the skull, the radiation can be given in a single outpatient setting, and there are no typical side effects like hair loss, and nausea and vomiting, that come with traditional radiation therapy.

This week on the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Bruce Pollock, a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, explains how gamma knife radiosurgery is performed.

 
February 26, 2020
Steps For Reversing Heart Disease
Millions of Americans have coronary artery disease caused by plaque buildup in their blood vessels. But once heart disease starts, can the damage be undone?

"Studies have shown you can reverse this narrowing of the arteries to the heart," says Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

So what can you do to make your heart healthier than it is today? The answer is in this week's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast.

 
February 19, 2020
What's behind a decrease in male fertility?
Sperm counts have dropped over 40% over the last 60 years”, according to Dr. Sevann Helo, a Mayo Clinic urologist. What’s behind the dramatic decrease? Smoking, stress and environmental exposures as well as a man’s biological clock affect fertility.

What can a man do to increase and maintain fertility? The answer on this latest episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A.