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June 18, 2022

The Keys to a Long Life
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Everyone wants to live a long, healthy life. New scientific research is showing us how to do it. One of the keys to longevity may surprise you. We will talk to an expert. Then, many people, particularly women, feel negatively about their body and how they look to others. A recent study reveals how to feel both stronger and thinner. And, the number of suicides among farmers and farm workers in the United States has remained stubbornly high since the end of the 1980s farm crisis. We'll explore the reasons why.
Episode Segments:
 
The Longevity Diet
Valter Longo, PhD is Director of the Longevity Institute at USC in Los Angeles, author of The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight. Dr. Vongo discussed his 25 years of research on aging, nutrition, disease and longevity. He believes, in addition to exercise and a healthy overall diet, that periodic fasting may be the key to a longer and healthier life. He outlined fasting-mimicking techniques that result in the same benefits as an absolute fast.
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Exercise and Body Image
Kathleen Martin Ginis, PhD, Professor in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences at the University of British Colombia led a study that found that just a half-hour of exercise can have a profound effect on a woman’s body image, making her feel both stronger and thinner. She noted that women, in general, have a tendency to feel negative about their bodies and, she explained how that poor body image can have negative implications for a woman’s psychological and physical health.
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Farming and Suicide
The number of suicides among farmers and farm workers in the United States has remained stubbornly high since the end of the 1980s farm crisis, much higher than workers in many other industries, according to research conducted by Corinne Peek-Asa, PhD, professor of Occupational and Environmental Health in the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa . She outlined the cultural and occupational factors that may contribute to this issue. She believes the solution may lie in existing resources in farming and rural communities, empowering them to more actively respond to citizens who are struggling.
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