Wednesday • July 17
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James, Bob and Ann
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This week's Hall of Fame lineup includes former football standouts Bob Brown and James Lofton. Our in-studio lovely lady is actress/model Ann Sheehan. Ann is a former cheerleader for the short-lived XFL Chicago Enforcers and was a member of the Adrenaline Rush Dancers of the Arena Football League’s Chicago Rush. (And fun to be around — in case anyone out there was wondering.)
Episode Segments:
 
Sports and Torts: Alana Campos

Ann Sheehan is a Chicago-born actress and model. She also was a cheerleader for the XFL Chicago Enforcers and a member of the Arena Football League Chicago Rush's Adrenaline Rush Dancers. Ann most recently had a role on "Deadly Affairs" hosted by Susan Lucci & was also part of NBC's "Nude Hippo" program that generally did not actually involve hippos or nudity. Earlier in her career, she was part of "Mancow's Morning Madhouse." Among her TV commercial credits is one for Luna Carpet.
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Sports and Torts: Hall of Famer Bob Brown

Bob "The Boomer" Brown, an All-America guard at Nebraska, was drafted in the first round in 1964 by both the National Football League’s Philadelphia Eagles and the Denver Broncos of the then-rival American Football League.e was named All-NFL seven of his 10 seasons with the Philadelphia Eagles (1964-68), Los Angeles Rams (1969-70), and Oakland Raiders (1971-73). Two of the three years he did not make the All-NFL team, he was named second-team All-NFL. Named the NFL/NFC offensive lineman of the year three times, Brown was also chosen to play in six Pro Bowls. He talk with him about this stellar career.
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Sports and Torts: Hall of Famer James Lofton

Hall of Fame wide receiver James Lofton was the No. 1 draft pick of the Green Bay Packers in 1978, and rookie of the year. In 16 seasons that saw him play for Green Bay, the Los Angeles Raiders, Buffalo Bills, Los Angeles Rams, and the Philadelphia Eagles, Lofton caught 764 passes for 14,004 yards and recorded six seasons of 1,000+ receiving yards. We'll look back on his career, both on the field, and on the sidelines as a coach.
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Guest(s) Appearing on this Episode
Bob Brown
At the University of Nebraska, Brown was an All-America selection at guard, and was voted the offensive lineman of the year by the 1963 Washington D.C. Touchdown Club. Brown was drafted in the first round (second overall) of the 1964 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles.[1] The contract he signed with the team had a $100,000 signing bonus. After his rookie season in 1964, Brown was named the NFL Rookie of the Year. He was named to the Pro Bowl in 1965 and 1966 during his five-season career with the Eagles.[2] After asking for a trade from the Eagles, Brown was sent to the Los Angeles Rams in a five-player trade on May 12, 1969. The Eagles traded Brown, along with cornerback Jim Nettles, to the Rams in exchange for offensive tackle Joe Carollo, guard Don Chuy and defensive back Irv Cross.Brown was traded by the Rams to the Oakland Raiders, along with two draft picks, in exchange for offensive tackle Harry Schuh and cornerback Kent McCloughan on June 23, 1971. Brown was named All-Pro during five of his ten seasons with the Eagles, Rams and Oakland Raiders. Named the NFL/NFC offensive lineman of the year three times, Brown was also chosen to play in six Pro Bowls - three with the Eagles, two with the Rams, and one final time with the Raiders. In 1993, Brown was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004. Brown's #64 was permanently retired by Nebraska in 2004.

Bob's Page at the Pro Football Wall of Fame Website

 
James Lofton
Hall of Fame wide receiver James Lofton was the No. 1 draft pick of the Green Bay Packers in 1978. He was a great athlete and an All-American wide receiver at Stanford University where he excelled not only at football, but as a track star, winning the NCAA long jump title as a senior As a football player, Lofton was a deep-threat at wide receiver, possessing both speed and great hands. He was named the NFL’s Rookie of the Year after catching 46 passes for 818 yards and 6 touchdowns. In 16 seasons that saw him play for Green Bay, the Los Angeles Raiders, Buffalo Bills, Los Angeles Rams, and the Philadelphia Eagles, Lofton caught 764 passes for 14,004 yards and recorded six seasons of 1,000+ receiving yards. Lofton was selected to play in eight Pro Bowls, seven while he was in Green Bay and one with Buffalo, and in 1991, at age 35, the speedy receiver became the oldest player in league history to record 1,000 receiving yards in a season. In 13 playoff games, he caught 41 passes for 759 yards and eight touchdowns. In three of those playoff games he recorded 100-yard plus performances. Lofton’s career total of 14,004 yards receiving was an NFL best at the time of his retirement. Lofton became the wide receiver coach for the San Diego Chargers in 2002 and continued that role until he was fired on January 22, 2008. In 2006, Lofton was one of two finalists for the Stanford head coaching job. That job went to Jim Harbaugh. Lofton was later announced as a candidate to become head coach for Oakland Raiders in 2007 but the job would later go to Lane Kiffin. In 2008, the Raiders hired him as their wide receivers coach. On January 13, 2009, Lofton was let go by the Oakland Raiders and replaced by Sanjay Lal.Lofton served as a color analyst and sideline reporter for NFL coverage on Westwood One radio from 1999-2001. In 2009 he re-joined the network to team with Dave Sims on Sunday Night Football broadcasts.

James' Career Stats