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Mayo Clinic Radio

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December 02, 2017
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized room or tube. In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, lungs can gather more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, a hazard of scuba diving. But it also can be used to treat serious infections, wounds that won't heal and carbon monoxide poisoning. Dr. Paul Claus, outgoing medical director of Mayo Clinic’s Hyperbaric and Altitude Medicine Program, will discuss the hyperbaric oxygen therapy program at Mayo Clinic.
 
November 25, 2017
Weight Gain After Menopause
A common problem for women as they age is weight gain. On average, women in their 50s and 60s gain 1.5 pounds per year. Hot flashes, sleep disturbances and mood changes during menopause can disrupt what was otherwise a healthy lifestyle. A Mayo Clinic study recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings looked at the risks and challenges of weight gain for middle-aged women. This study led researchers to develop a series of recommendations. Dr. Ekta Kapoor, an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic and lead author of the study, will discuss the study findings and other problems women face as they reach menopause.
 
November 18, 2017
Integrative health
Mayo Clinic's Integrative Medicine and Health team offers integrative therapies such as acupuncture, massage and meditation to help people manage disease symptoms by reducing fatigue, pain and anxiety. Now, Mayo Clinic is taking it a step further. A new Mayo Clinic book, Mayo Clinic: The Integrative Guide to Good Health, addresses all aspects of health, including mind, body and spirit. The book aims to show how home remedies can meet alternative therapies to transform well-being. Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program and one of the authors of the book, will discuss how complementary techniques can enhance conventional medicine.
 
November 11, 2017
The Great American Smokeout
Each year, on the third Thursday in November, the American Cancer Society invites smokers across the nation to take part in The Great American Smokeout — a day aimed at encouraging people to quit smoking. Dr. David Midthun, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Mayo Clinic, and Dr. J. Taylor Hays, an internal medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic, will explain how a new study combines lung cancer screening with proactive referrals and increased communication to help people quit smoking.

Also on the program, Dr. William Gahl, clinical director of the National Institutes of Health's Genetic and Rare Diseases Program, will discuss rare and undiagnosed diseases. And Dr. Timothy Curry, director of the education program at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, and Dr. Halena Gazelka, assistant professor of anesthesiology and perioperative medicine at Mayo Clinic, will share the latest research on pharmacogenomics and pain medication.
 
November 04, 2017
Diabetes awareness
November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and Dr. Robert Rizza, an endocrinologist and diabetes expert at Mayo Clinic, will discuss diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diabetes. Also on the program, Dr. Rachel Tyndale, research chair in pharmacogenomics at the University of Toronto, explains how pharmacogenomics may lead to better treatments to help people quit smoking. And Dr. William Tatum, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss epilepsy.
 
October 28, 2017
National Health Checkup
Dr. Minetta Liu, a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic, breaks down the latest results of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup. Also on the program, Dr. Myra Wick, a medical geneticist at Mayo Clinic, explains the latest advances in prenatal screening. And Dr. Karthik Balakrishnan, an otolaryngologist at Mayo Clinic, discusses treatment for pediatric ear, nose and throat problems.
 
October 21, 2017
2017 Breast Cancer Awareness Month
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Karthik Ghosh, director of the Breast Diagnostic Clinic at Mayo Clinic, will highlight the importance of breast cancer screening and early detection. Also on the program, Dr. Elizabeth Stewart, division chair of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Mayo Clinic, will discuss causes of infertility and treatment options. And Dr. David Erasmus, medical director of Mayo Clinic's Lung Transplant Program, will explain lung restoration, which can make more donor lungs available for transplant.
 
October 14, 2017
Minimally invasive spine surgery
Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to their health care provider or miss work. It's also a leading cause of disability worldwide. Back pain, which can come on suddenly (acute), may be caused by a fall or heavy lifting. Acute back pain lasts less than six weeks and usually goes away with some precautions and over-the-counter pain relief. Back pain that lasts more than three months is considered chronic and may require more extensive treatment, including surgery.

Dr. Mohamad Bydon, a neurosurgeon at Mayo Clinic, will discuss minimally invasive spine surgery. Also on the program, Dr. Allison Rosenthal, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic, will share how her leukemia diagnosis changed not only her life, but also her career path. And Dr. M. Rizwan Sohail, director of the Travel and Tropical Medicine Clinic at Mayo Clinic, will have tips for dealing with jet lag
 
October 07, 2017
Individualizing Medicine Conference 2017 preview
Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, is tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Using a person's unique genetic code, researchers and health care providers can more effectively and precisely diagnose, treat, predict and, eventually, prevent disease. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine does both research and patient care, working to bring new genomic-based tests and treatments from the laboratory to clinical practice. On this episode of the Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Keith Stewart, Carlson and Nelson endowed director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, previewed "Individualizing Medicine Conference 2017," which tooke place Oct. 9-11 in Rochester, Minnesota. The conference will feature speakers from around the world on topics related to genomics and personalized medicine. Also on the program, Dr. Amanika Kumar, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic, will explain the importance of having quality of life discussions with your health care provider before and during cancer care. And Dr. John Pemberton, a colorectal surgeon at Mayo Clinic, will discuss treatment for common colorectal problems.
 
September 30, 2017
Becoming Doctor Q
Born in a small village outside of Mexicali, Mexico, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa started working at age 5 to help with his family's expenses. When he finished school, he believed that opportunity for a better life could be found in the U.S. When he arrived in the U.S. at age 19, he spoke no English. Quinones-Hinojosa learned the English language at a community college, received a scholarship to the University of California, Berkeley, and then went on to graduate from Harvard Medical School. The story of becoming "Dr. Q," as he is affectionately known, is an incredible journey that is being made into a feature film.

Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, chair of Neurologic Surgery at Mayo Clinic, will share his personal journey and discuss his work as a neurosurgeon. Also on the program, Dr. Evanthia Galanis, chair of the Molecular Medicine Department at Mayo Clinic, will explain how the measles virus is being used to fight cancer. And Dr. Rahma Warsame, an internist and researcher at Mayo Clinic, will discuss the financial toxicity of cancer care
 
September 23, 2017
Gynecologic cancers
Gynecologic cancers are cancers that start in a woman’s reproductive organs. The five main types are: cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year more than 80,000 women in the U.S. are told they have a gynecologic cancer, and more than 25,000 women die from these diseases. September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, a nationwide effort to educate women about screening and prevention.

Dr. Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, a gynecologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, will cover diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gynecologic cancers. Also on the program, Kate Zeratsky, a dietician at Mayo Clinic, will discuss detox diets. And Dr. Arya Mohabbat, the practice chair of Mayo Clinic’s Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic, will talk about improving care for fibromyalgia patients.
 
September 16, 2017
Transforming Medical Education
Fredric Meyer, M.D., executive dean of education, Mayo Clinic, will share ideas and innovations that are transforming medical education and helping modernize training for tomorrow's doctors. Dr. Meyer is the Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education. Also on the program, Dr. David Knopman, a neurologist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss how lifestyle choices throughout your life can affect your risk of dementia. And Dr. Michael Ackerman, a pediatric cardiologist at Mayo Clinic, will explain the heart rhythm condition known as long QT syndrome
 
September 09, 2017
Fighting the Opioid Epidemic
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of people receiving an opioid prescription and the number of deaths from overdose has nearly quadrupled over the past 15 years. Opioids, including prescription drugs and heroin, killed more than 33,000 people in 2015 — the latest year of data from the CDC.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Michael Hooten, an anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss the opioid epidemic in America. Also on the program, Dr. Steve Peters, chief medical information officer, Mayo Clinic, will explain the Plummer Project — Mayo Clinic's institutional move to a single, integrated electronic health record and billing system. And Dr. Douglas Wood, medical director, Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation, will preview the upcoming Transform 2017 conference.
 
September 02, 2017
Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
More than 14,000 women die annually from ovarian cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the reproductive organ cancers, often goes undetected until it has spread within the pelvis and abdomen. At this late stage, ovarian cancer is more difficult to treat and is frequently fatal.

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Carrie Langstraat, a gynecologic oncologist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss treatment options for ovarian cancer and the hopes for improving early detection.

Also on the program, Dr. Andres Acosta, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, will review a new, individualized approach to treating obesity through the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. And Dr. Justin Kreuter, medical director for the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Program, shares the new eligibility guidelines for blood donors with previous cancer diagnoses.
 
August 26, 2017
Treatment Options for Alzheimer’s disease
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia — a group of brain disorders that cause the loss of intellectual and social skills. In Alzheimer's disease, the brain cells degenerate and die, causing a steady decline in memory and mental function. At first, someone with Alzheimer's disease may notice mild confusion and difficulty remembering. Eventually, people with the disease may forget important people in their lives and undergo dramatic personality changes.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, will provide an update on diagnosis and treatment options for Alzheimer’s disease. Also on the program, Dr. Landon Trost, a urologist at Mayo Clinic, shares a warning about the dangers of taking herbal Viagra. And Dr. Sanjay Bagaria, a surgeon at Mayo Clinic, will explain hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy — a cancer treatment using heated chemotherapy.
 
August 19, 2017
Artificial Intelligence in Health Care
When you hear the term artificial intelligence (AI) you may think of robots replacing humans. AI is defined as a computer system that can do tasks that humans require intelligence to do. It could be as simple as a computer learning to play chess or as complex as a driverless car. In the world of health care delivery, researchers are looking for ways to use AI to help improve patient care and ease the burden on health care providers.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Tufia Haddad, a Mayo Clinic oncologist and the physician leader for Mayo Clinic’s collaboration with IBM Watson, will discuss AI and cognitive computing in health care. Also on the program, Dr. Tina Hieken, a Mayo Clinic surgeon, will explain a new fast-track breast cancer treatment option using brachytherapy. And Dr. Neena Abraham, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, shares research on anticoagulants and the risk of internal bleeding
 
August 12, 2017
Back to School Show
August means it is time for kids and parents around the U.S. to start back-to-school planning, but shopping for school supplies and new tennis shoes is only a part of the preparation. Students must prepare for the change of schedule and routine as they head back to the classroom or off to college.

Dr. Robert Jacobson, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic, will offer helpful tips to help your kids get ready for school and discuss the necessary immunizations for school-age children. Also on the program, Dr. Paul Croarkin, a pediatric psychiatrist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss warning signs of anxiety and depression in teenagers. And Dr. Suresh Kotagal, a pediatric neurologist at Mayo Clinic, will share recommendations on kids and sleep
 
August 05, 2017
Probiotics: How they Work
A human’s digestive tract teems with trillions of bacteria. There are more bacteria in your intestines than cells in your body. But not all of the bacteria in your body are good for you. Research suggests that having too many of the bad and not enough of the good bacteria — caused, in part, by an unhealthy diet — can wreak havoc on your body’s systems. Probiotics are good bacteria that could help promote a healthy gut and a strong immune system.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Joseph Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, will help explain probiotics and how they work. Also on the program, Dr. Erin DeMartino, an ethics researcher at Mayo Clinic, will discuss how advance directive laws differ from state to state. And Dr. Judy Boughey, a surgeon and vice chair of research at Mayo Clinic, will share the findings of a study on the risk of lymphedema in breast cancer patients.
 
July 29, 2017
Genomics
The Human Genome Project was launched in 1990 to determine the DNA sequence of the entire human genome. Since its completion in 2003, the project has paved the way for scientists to gather knowledge about a patient’s genome to diagnose, predict, treat and prevent disease. This project also has advanced personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, director of the pharmacogenomics program in the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic, will explain how genomic information can tailor treatment to individual patients. Also on the program, Dr. Sophie Bakri, an ophthalmologist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss adult eye health. And Dr. Dawn Mussallem, a family physician at Mayo Clinic, will share how cancer survivorship care plans can help patients and their families prepare for the future.

 
July 22, 2017
Being a paramedic
Paramedics provide first-line medical or emergency care for sick and injured people while they are being transported to the hospital for care. They typically operate in teams, with one person serving as an emergency vehicle operator, while the other continues to provide lifesaving emergency care to the patient while en route to a medical facility. Angela Jarrett, a supervisor with Gold Cross Ambulance, will share what it’s like being a paramedic. Also on the program, Dr. Matthew Ferber, a geneticist at Mayo Clinic, will explain what information can be uncovered by direct-to-consumer genetic testing. And Dr. Pritish Tosh, an infectious diseases expert at Mayo Clinic, will discuss the recent rise in sexually transmitted infections.
 
July 15, 2017
Human Hibernation
Since Yuri Gagarin achieved the first manned space flight in April 1961, humans have been fascinated by space travel. The world watched as Neil Armstrong walked on the moon in July 1969. Since then, space programs have been looking to the next frontier: humans landing on Mars. According to NASA, a trip to the red planet will require astronauts to spend 250 days confined in a spacecraft to reach the destination.

On this edition of the Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Matthew Kumar, an anesthesiologist at Mayo Clinic, will explain how Mayo Clinic is working with NASA to research medically induced hypothermia. This kind of human hibernation could be a way to help astronauts travel to Mars. Also on the program, Dr. Sundeep Khosla, an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, explains the importance of vitamin D. And Jennifer Welper, an executive chef with the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, will share ideas for healthy summer grilling.
 
July 08, 2017
Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Allergies
Antibiotics have been used for more than 70 years to treat patients who have infectious diseases. Since the 1940s, these drugs have greatly reduced illness and death from infection. However, antibiotics have been used so widely and for so long now that the drugs have become less effective. Organisms the antibiotics are designed to kill have adapted. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, an infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss antibiotic resistance and antibiotic allergies. Also on the program, Dr. John Wilkinson, a primary care physician at Mayo Clinic, discusses whether an annual exam is still necessary. And Dr. Edward Creagan, a medical oncologist at Mayo Clinic, will explore how the high cost of health care is affecting patient's decision-making when it comes to treatment.
 
July 01, 2017
Media Recommendations for Children
Today's generation of children is growing up immersed in media. From TV and video games to smartphones and social media, there’s the possibility of constant media exposure. Last fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics announced new recommendations for children’s media use, including how to make a family media use plan.

On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Nusheen Ameenuddin, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic, will explain the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendations on media and children. Dr. Ameenuddin also will discuss the importance of the measles vaccine. Also on the program, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, will debunk myths about statins. And Dr. Timothy Curry, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist, will explain how awareness under anesthesia can happen.

 
June 24, 2017
Summer Safety
ummertime is here, and the Fourth of July holiday is fast approaching. Many kids are out of school, and it’s time for outdoor activities and family vacations. Summer activities such as biking, swimming, boating or riding a four-wheeler can be a lot of fun. But these activities also require precautions to stay safe and healthy. Dr. Luke Wood, a Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician, will share tips for keeping safe this summer. Also on the program, Dani Johnson, a physical therapist with the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, will discuss how adults can benefit from play. And Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a Mayo Clinic infectious disease specialist, will explain how to avoid salmonella and keep food safe in the heat
 
June 17, 2017
Female urinary incontinence
Urinary incontinence is the loss of bladder control, resulting in the accidental loss of urine. Due to pregnancy, childbirth, menopause and the structure of the female urinary tract, women are twice as likely as men to suffer from urinary incontinence. While urinary incontinence might be only slightly bothersome for some, it can be totally debilitating for others. For some women, the chance of embarrassment keeps them from enjoying many physical activities, including exercising. But, the good news is that effective treatments are available for treating urinary incontinence if women are willing to discuss it with their health care provider.

On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Deborah Lightner, a Mayo Clinic urologist, will discuss options for preventing and treating urinary incontinence. Also on the program, Dr. James Naessens, a researcher at the Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, will share findings on the importance of getting a second opinion. And Dr. Juan Brito Campana, a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, will explain why thyroid medications may be overprescribed in older adults
 
June 10, 2017
Men's Health Week
When it comes to men’s health, you've likely heard the basics before: Eat right, exercise, get enough sleep, avoid tobacco and limit stress. But other men’s health concerns, such as sexual health and low testosterone levels, also must be addressed as men age. National Men’s Health Week is observed each year before Father’s Day as a yearly reminder for men to take steps to be healthier.

On this week's program, Dr. Landon Trost, a urologist at Mayo Clinic, will discuss common men's health concerns, including vasectomy and testosterone therapy. Also on the program, Dr. Joseph Murray, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, will explain why what you eat before bed can affect your sleep. And Dr. Ahmed Mohamed, a Mayo Clinic resident, will share his journey from Somalian refugee to medical school.

 
June 03, 2017
Bogus Cancer Treatments
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is cracking down on companies making unproven cancer treatment claims. Recently, the FDA issued warning letters to 14 companies that it says illegally sell products that fraudulently claim to prevent, diagnose, treat or cure cancer. The FDA calls it “cruel deception” in that these companies target desperate consumers. Dr. Timothy Moynihan, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic, will explain the FDA crackdown and discuss common cancer myths. Also on the program, Dr. Elizabeth Cozine, a primary care physician at Mayo Clinic, will cover primary care topics, including ear infections, HPV and the whooping cough vaccine for pregnant women. And Dr. Brian Carlsen, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic, will share the story of reattaching the hand of a young accident victim.
 
May 27, 2017
Cancer Nutrition
Common side effects of cancer treatment can include nausea, vomiting, fatigue and weight loss. These side effects make getting proper nutrition a challenge. To improve the lives of cancer patients, leading cancer centers in the U.S., including Mayo Clinic, have formed the nonprofit Cancer Nutrition Consortium. Through research and collaboration with health, industry and culinary experts, the Cancer Nutrition Consortium offers recipes and resources for those undergoing cancer treatment. Dr. Paul Limburg, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, and Teresa McJoynt, a Mayo Clinic representative with the consortium, will discuss nutrition during cancer treatment. Also on the program, Dr. Peter Grahn, a Mayo Clinic neurobiology researcher, will share how a devastating injury inspired a career. And Dr. Benjamin Brown, a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, will explain the latest in stroke treatment interventions
 
May 20, 2017
May is Mental Health Month
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. will experience a mental health condition in his or her lifetime. Mental health conditions are disorders that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Examples of mental illness include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and addictive behaviors. In May, NAMI and participants across the country raise awareness for mental health in an effort to fight stigma, provide support and educate the public. Dr. Craig Sawchuk, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, will discuss mental health awareness. Also on the program, Dr. Jamie Van Gompel, a Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, will explain how new imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance elastography, are improving neurosurgery. And May 14-20 is National Women's Health Week. Dr. Jacqueline Thielen, a women's health expert at Mayo Clinic, will discuss women’s health at every age.
 
May 13, 2017
Stroke awareness & genomics education
According to the National Institutes of Health, there are more than 800,000 strokes each year in the U.S. A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of your brain is interrupted or severely reduced, depriving brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. Stroke, which is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., causes more serious long-term disabilities than any other disease. May is National Stroke Awareness Month, an effort to educate the public about stroke risk factors and the importance of acting quickly when a stroke occurs.

On this program, neurologist and stroke expert Dr. Robert Brown Jr. discusses the warning signs of stroke and tips for stroke prevention. Also on the program, Dr. Timothy Curry, director of the Education Program for the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, will explain Mayo Clinic's efforts to educate patients and providers on how genetic information can improve health care. And cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky will discuss a new study that found gray hair can indicate cardiac risk.

 
May 06, 2017
Spinal cord injury research
Spinal cord injury can cause permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions below the site of the injury, including paralysis. But a study being done at Mayo Clinic, in collaboration with UCLA researchers, has successfully used intense physical therapy and electrical stimulation of the spinal cord to return voluntary movements to a previously paralyzed patient. The research findings recently were published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The study's principal investigators, Dr. Kristin Zhao, director of Mayo Clinic's Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, and Dr. Kendall Lee, director of Mayo Clinic's Neural Engineering Laboratory, will discuss the results and what's ahead in spinal cord injury research.

Also on the program, Dr. Elizabeth Cozine, a Mayo Clinic Health System primary care physician, will discuss how to deal with seasonal allergies. And infectious disease specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh will have an update on the effectiveness of this past season's flu vaccine.

 
April 29, 2017
Prostate Cancer
The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system. It produces fluid to nourish and protect sperm. Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Usually prostate cancer grows slowly and initially remains confined to the prostate gland, where it may not cause serious harm. While some types of prostate cancer may need minimal or no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly. So how do patients make decisions about screening and treatment?

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, general internist Dr. Jon Tilburt and retired Col. Jim Williams, a prostate cancer patient, will explain a pilot study at Mayo Clinic to help patients make informed decisions when it comes to prostate cancer treatment. Also on the program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Sanj Kakar will discuss wrist injuries. And anesthesiologist and human performance expert Dr. Michael Joyner will explain rhabdomyolysis, a rare condition that causes muscle cells to break down.
 
April 22, 2017
Common Foot Problems
Your foot is an intricate network of bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Feet must be strong enough to bear your body weight, but that makes them prone to injury and pain. Foot pain can affect any part of your foot, from your toes to your Achilles tendon at the back of your heel. Common problems include bunions, plantar warts, and corns and callouses. However, more serious conditions, such as fractures, arthritis and neuropathy, also can develop in the feet.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Norman Turner III will discuss treatment for common foot problems and ways to prevent them. Also on the program, parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt will have an update on the Lyme disease predictions for 2017. And critical care physician and sleep medicine expert Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler will try to help answer this common question: Why can't I sleep?
 
April 15, 2017
Geriatric Care
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people age 65 and older will double in the U.S. over the next three decades. By 2050, almost 85 million adults will be 65 or older. This aging population presents its own set of challenges when it comes to health care.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Paul Takahashi, a Mayo Clinic geriatrician, will explain what physicians look for during a geriatric exam and offer tips for staying healthy and safe as you age. Also on the program, Dr. Clayton Cowl, division chair of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine, will discuss the health of over-the-road truck drivers. And dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis will discuss why you should avoid tanning beds.
 
April 08, 2017
Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. Parkinson’s develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. While a tremor may be the most well-known sign of Parkinson's disease, the disorder commonly also causes stiffness and slowing of movement. April is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, neurologist Dr. J. Eric Ahlskog will discuss treatment options for Parkinson's disease. Also on the program, preventive medicine and rehabilitation expert Dr. Jay Smith will share new treatment options for carpal tunnel syndrome. And palliative care specialist Dr. Jacob Strand will explain how early referrals to hospice care can help patients and families benefit from many of the services they are eligible for at the end of life.

 
April 01, 2017
Clinic Transplant Center
According to the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network, each day in the U.S., around 120,000 people are waiting for an organ transplant, and another person gets added to that list every 10 minutes. April is National Donate Life Month — a campaign to encourage Americans to register as organ, eye and tissue donors. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, learn about Mayo Clinic's Transplant Center from its former director, Dr. Brooks Edwards. Also on the program, psychologist Dr. Andrea Huebner will discuss autism spectrum disorder. And Dr. K Sreekumaran Nair shares findings of a recent study that shows high-intensity interval training can help reverse the aging process at the cellular level.
 
March 25, 2017
Diabetes Alert Day
According to Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes. That’s about 1 out of every 11 people in the U.S. Just as startling is that 1 out of 4 people with diabetes don’t know they have it. Diabetes means there is too much glucose, or sugar, in the blood. This can lead to serious health problems, such as increased risk of cardiovascular disease, nerve and kidney damage, and problems with the eyes and feet. The fourth Tuesday in March is Diabetes Alert Day — a one-day wake-up call to inform the American public about the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when diabetes is left undiagnosed or untreated. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Rizza will discuss diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diabetes. Also on the program, neurologist Dr. David Knopman will share information on how the brain ages and what can be done to protect brain health. And Debbie Fuehrer, a counselor with Mayo Clinic's Integrative Medicine and Health Program, will explain how hypnosis is used in the clinical setting.
 
March 18, 2017
Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
According to the National Institutes of Health, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S. and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps that, over time, can become colon cancers. Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, so regular screening tests are recommended to help prevent colon cancer by identifying and removing polyps before they become cancerous. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gastroenterologist Dr. David Ahlquist will discuss colorectal cancer screening and prevention as part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Also on the program, surgeon Dr. Rodrigo Ruano will explain fetal surgeryin utero procedures now possible to correct some birth defects. And Dr. Stephen Cassivi, vice chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery, will explain a pilot study that's using video visits for post-surgical follow-up.According to the National Institutes of Health, colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S. and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps that, over time, can become colon cancers. Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, so regular screening tests are recommended to help prevent colon cancer by identifying and removing polyps before they become cancerous. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gastroenterologist Dr. David Ahlquist will discuss colorectal cancer screening and prevention as part of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Also on the program, surgeon Dr. Rodrigo Ruano will explain fetal surgeryin utero procedures now possible to correct some birth defects. And Dr. Stephen Cassivi, vice chair of Mayo Clinic's Department of Surgery, will explain a pilot study that's using video visits for post-surgical follow-up.
 
March 11, 2017
National Nutrition Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all American adults have one or more preventable chronic diseases, and many are related to poor quality eating patterns and physical inactivity. These include cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes. March is National Nutrition Month, an education and information campaign created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to help you make informed food choices and develop sound eating and physical activity habits. The theme of the campaign this year is Put Your Best Fork Forward. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, dietitian Kate Zeratsky will cover the five key messages of the campaign. Also on the program, oncologist Dr. Kathryn Ruddy will discuss the importance of cancer survivorship programs for people who live with the disease. And physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Dr. Jay Smith will share the latest treatment options for plantar fasciitis.
 
March 04, 2017
Multiple sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis, commonly known as MS, is a potentially disabling disease of the central nervous system. In MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body. Eventually, the disease can cause the nerves themselves to deteriorate or become permanently damaged. March is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month, and, on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Mark Keegan, a neurologist and MS division chair at Mayo Clinic, will discuss treatment options for MS. Also on the program, cardiologist Dr. Rekha Mankad explains why caution should be used when taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen. And Dr. William Hogan, director of the Mayo Clinic Bone Marrow Transplant Program, will explain how and why a bone marrow transplant is done.
 
February 25, 2017
Face Transplant
Mayo Clinic has performed its first, near-total face transplant. The goal of face transplantation is to restore facial structures and improve function for patients with devastating injury or deformity. To prepare for this highly complex surgery, the surgical team used virtual surgical planning technology and 3-D printing to optimize the outcomes of the surgery. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Samir Mardini and Dr. Hatem Amer, the surgical director and medical director, respectively, for the Mayo Clinic Essam and Dalal Obaid Center for Reconstructive Transplant Surgery, join the program to discuss planning and completing this life-changing transplant. Also on the program, pediatrician Dr. Angela Mattke will share the latest recommendations on kids and screen time. And licensed social worker Denise Morcomb will discuss the difficult but important topic of domestic abuse.
 
February 18, 2017
Liver Transplant and Organ Donation
According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 14,000 people are waiting for a liver transplant today in the U.S. Liver transplant usually is reserved as a treatment option for people who have significant complications due to end-stage chronic liver disease. In rare cases, sudden failure of a previously normal liver may occur. The liver is just one of several organs, including kidney, heart and lung, that have long transplant waiting lists. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, transplant surgeon Dr. Charles Rosen will discuss liver transplant and the importance of organ donation. Also on the program, Toni Mangskau, clinical trials referral coordinator at Mayo Clinic’s Cancer Education Center in Rochester, Minnesota, will explain how clinical trials are conducted. And gastroenterologist Dr. Michael Camilleri will offer prevention tips for the common problem of constipation.
 
February 11, 2017
Vitamin D Recommendations
Vitamin D is found in many foods, including fish, eggs, fortified milk and cod liver oil. The sun also adds to the body’s daily production of vitamin D, and as little as 10 minutes of exposure is thought to help prevent deficiency. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which forms and maintains strong bones. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, preventive medicine specialist Dr. Donald Hensrud will cover the latest vitamin D recommendations and discuss the second edition of The Mayo Clinic Diet. Also on the program, Dr. Rekha Mankad, director of Mayo Clinic's Cardio-Rheumatology Clinic, will discuss women and heart disease as part of American Heart Month. And cardiologist Dr. Iftikhar Kullo will explain a new genetic test being used to detect a cardiovascular condition known as familial hypercholesterolemia.
 
February 04, 2017
Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program

According to the American Heart Association, half of all Americans have at least one major risk factor for heart disease. It's the No. 1 killer in America, and, in 2015, the number of Americans dying of heart disease increased for the first time in a decade. So why has the progress against this deadly disease stalled? On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky will discuss the ongoing battle against heart disease and offer tips for prevention. Also on the program, exercise specialist Dan Gaz will explain the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and its three pillars of health and wellness. And radiologist Dr. Adam Weisbrod will share the latest innovations in radiology.

 
January 28, 2017
Electronic Therapy
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), more than 66 million Americans live with mental illness. Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions — disorders that affect mood, thinking and behavior. While treatment can be effective, access to care is a problem. NAMI estimates that 60 percent of adults with a mental health condition didn't receive mental health services in the previous year. However, there may be a new solution. The development of behavioral intervention technologies, such as mobile apps and online programs, is expanding mental health resources for patients. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, psychologist Dr. Craig Sawchuk joins the program to discuss the use of electronic therapy for mental health conditions. Also on the program, Dr. Justin Kreuter, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Program, shares the importance of blood donation and the need for cultivating a new generation of donors. And primary care physician Dr. Kathy MacLaughlin will cover the importance of cervical cancer screening and the HPV vaccine for prevention of cervical cancer.
 
January 21, 2017
Thyroid disease

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. The thyroid makes hormones to help control the rate of many activities in your body, including how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats. But, sometimes, problems develop with the thyroid gland, and it doesn’t secrete the right level of hormones. January is Thyroid Disease Awareness Month. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, endocrinologist Dr. John C. Morris III will discuss diagnosis and treatment of thyroid conditions, such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease and thyroid cancer. Also on the program, ophthalmologist Dr. Arthur Sit will explain the importance of regular eye exams to prevent glaucoma. And high-risk pregnancy certified nurse practitioner Deb Miller will share steps women can take to help prevent birth defects.

 
January 14, 2017
Kidney Stone Prevention
Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form inside your kidneys. If you've had them, you know that passing kidney stones can be painful. Depending on your situation, you may need nothing more than to take pain medication and drink lots of water to pass a kidney stone. In other instances, when the stones cause complications, more extensive treatment may be required. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, urologist Dr. David E. Patterson will cover treatment and prevention of kidney stones. Also on the program, colorectal surgeon Dr. Robert Cima will explain enhanced recovery after surgery a technique that helps patients return home more quickly after an operation. And neurologist Dr. Jeremy Cutsforth-Gregory will discuss the difficult-to-diagnose disease of postural orthostatic tachychardia syndrome, commonly known as POTS.
 
January 07, 2017
Orthopedic trauma patient story
essica Nelson doesn’t remember much about the automobile accident that nearly took her life. After surgery in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, to stabilize a compound fracture in her lower leg, Nelson developed an infection that ate away more than 3 inches of bone, and amputation was discussed. An avid volleyball player with hopes of playing in college, Nelson came to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion and met with orthopedic trauma surgeon Dr. Andy Sems in the hopes of saving her leg. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Sems and Nelson join the program to tell the story. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic reporter Jeff Olsen will explain how covering medical topics this past year helped him make lifestyle changes and improve his own health. Finally, internal medicine specialist Dr. Anjali Bhagra will share the latest research on how men and women differ when it comes to dealing with stress.
 
December 31, 2016
Women's Issues
On this encore presentation of Mayo Clinic Radio, two previously aired segments will be revisited on the program. First, women's health expert Dr. Stephanie Faubion will explain genitourinary syndrome of menopause and other problems women experience during menopause. Then, psychiatrist Dr. Teresa Rummans will discuss the widespread problem of mental illness and the challenges it presents. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 1 in 5 Americans lives with a mental health condition.
 
December 24, 2016
Family Medicine- Then and Now
The holidays often mean spending time with family. On this special holiday edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, listen to Mayo Clinic's multigenerational story about a father and daughter who are primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic. Dr. John Wilkinson, and his daughter, Dr. Elizabeth Cozine, join the program to talk family medicine — then and now. Two previously aired segments also will be revisited on the program. First, Dr. James Kirkland will share Mayo Clinic research on the aging process. Then, Mayo Clinic expert, Dr. Peter Gloviczki, will provide an overview of varicose veins. While often just a cosmetic concern, in some cases, varicose veins can cause pain and discomfort that requires treatment. You’ll hear about varicose vein treatment options from Dr. Glovczki, who also will share how practicing magic helped him become a physician.
 
December 17, 2016
Crohn's disease
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health estimate that more than half a million people in the U.S. have Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory bowel disease that most often begins gradually but can worsen over time. Symptoms can include diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, learn about treating Crohn’s disease from Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist Dr. Edward Loftus Jr. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. William Young Jr. will explain why the pituitary gland is known as the “master gland," and pediatrician Dr. Esther Krych will share the latest infant sleep recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 
December 10, 2016
Cancer Therapies
Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S., and the deadliest form of skin cancer is melanoma. The Melanoma Research Laboratory at Mayo Clinic is working to improve survival rates by developing novel treatments for metastatic melanoma. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Svetomir Markovic, director of the lab, will discuss how immunotherapy and nanomedicines are showing promise in treating cancer. Also on the program, internal medicine specialist Dr. Anjali Bhagra will explain why point-of-care ultrasound is being used in the clinical setting to make more accurate bedside assessments of patients, and dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis will have tips for winter skin care.
 
December 03, 2016
Stress and resiliency
You probably know what stress feels like. The average person has 150 undone tasks at any given time. But what can you do to manage stress? One key is resiliency: being able to adapt to life's misfortunes and setbacks. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, stress and resiliency expert Dr. Amit Sood shares tools to help manage stress and improve resiliency. Also on the program, infectious diseases specialist Dr. Andrew Badley will discuss improved treatment for AIDS and the work toward a cure for HIV as part of World AIDS Day, which will be celebrated on Dec. 1. And Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler will discuss the latest research on teens and sleep
 
November 26, 2016
Patients Give Thanks
On this special Thanksgiving edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, you’ll hear from three patients who have reason to give thanks. First, we revisit an unusual transplant story. Gastroenterologist Dr. Sahil Khanna and patient Stephanie Bennett explain how fecal transplant was used to treat her Clostridium difficile infection. Also on the program, licensed acupuncturist Sara Bublitz and her patient, Heather Spaniol, share how alternative therapies, including cupping, helped manage the pain after a battle with flesh-eating bacteria. And, hear a repeat of the story of Jimmy Dunbar, a transplant patient waiting for a heart transplant
 
November 19, 2016
Precision Medicine & peripheral artery disease
Precision medicine is a new approach to disease treatment and prevention based on people’s individual differences in genes, environment and lifestyle. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Kathy Hudson, deputy director for science, outreach, and policy at the National Institutes of Health, will explain the Precision Medicine Initiative. This year, Mayo Clinic was selected as the recipient of the $142 million grant to be the central biobank from the National Institutes of Health All of Us Research Program biobank (formerly the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program). The All of Us Research Program biobank is expected to be a major force in advancing precision medicine and contributing to research and improved health care. NIH aims to begin enrolling participants in 2016 and reach 1 million volunteers within three to four years. We'll also hear from patient Kathy Giusti, founder of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, on how precision medicine changed the course of her own treatment. Also on the program, vascular surgeon Dr. Randall DeMartino will discuss the common circulatory problem known as peripheral artery disease. And pediatric sports medicine specialist Dr. David Soma will discuss why an increasing number of youth soccer players are seeking emergency treatment for concussions each year.
 
November 12, 2016
Pain Management
According to the National Institutes of Health, chronic pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined. Chronic pain is the most common cause of disability in the U.S., and it’s often treated with opioid pain medications. But opioids have side effects, including the risk of addiction. To find better ways to manage chronic pain, clinical trials at Mayo Clinic are testing complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, massage and yoga, as alternatives to medications. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, explains complementary pain management therapies. Dr. Bauer also will unveil Mayo Clinic’s new Well Living Lab, which studies the connection between healthy living and the indoor environment. Also on the program, psychologist Dr. Bridget Biggs will discuss the childhood obesity epidemic. And radiation oncologist Dr. Nadia Laack will give an update on the Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Therapy Program.
 
November 05, 2016
Mayo Clinic National Heath Check-Up
In January 2016, Mayo Clinic began conducting the National Health Check-Up — a survey conducted several times throughout the year to take the pulse of Americans on consumer health opinions and behaviors. The most recent results revealed that adults in the U.S. feel the biggest health concern in the country is cancer. Other top concerns were obesity; neurological diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer’s; diabetes; and heart disease. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. John Wald, medical director for Public Affairs at Mayo Clinic, will share more insights gained from the National Health Check-Up survey. Also on the program, pediatric urologist Dr. Patricio Gargollo will cover common pediatric urology problems, including bed-wetting. And psychiatrist Dr. Michael Bostwick will share some startling statistics about suicide and suicide attempts.
 
October 29, 2016
Hypertension
Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure. High blood pressure, known as hypertension, generally develops over many years. Uncontrolled hypertension increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke and kidney problems. Luckily, hypertension can be controlled with careful treatment and monitoring. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, nephrologist Dr. Vincent Canzanello will discuss treatment and prevention of hypertension. Also on the program, Dr. Chet Rihal, division chair, Cardiovascular Diseases, will discuss causes, treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease. And, keeping the heart in mind, transplant surgeon Dr. Richard Daly shares the latest numbers from Mayo Clinic’s Heart Transplant Program
 
October 22, 2016
HPV Vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that each year, about 14 million Americans become infected with HPV. Most of those infected are teenagers or young adults. A vaccine was introduced in 2006 to help prevent HPV-related cancers, but a decade later, the HPV vaccine continues to be the most underutilized childhood immunization, and especially so for boys. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, vaccine specialist Dr. Gregory Poland will discuss the importance of the HPV vaccine. Dr. Poland also will provide the latest update on Zika virus. Also on the program, oncologist Dr. Timothy Moynihan discusses the link between obesity and increased risk for at least 13 types of cancer. And vascular and endovascular surgeon Dr. Gustavo Oderich explains how a new type of stent has improved surgical options for treating complex aortic aneurysms

 
October 15, 2016
Hearing Loss
Hearing loss that occurs gradually as you age is common. About 25 percent of people in the U.S. between the ages of 55 and 64 have some degree of hearing loss. And for those older than 65, the number is almost 50 percent. New advances in treatment options, including improved hearing aids and cochlear implant devices, means treatment is available for most people. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Gayla Poling, director of Diagnostic Audiology at Mayo Clinic, will discuss hearing loss treatment and prevention. Also on the program, pediatrician Dr. Robert Jacobson will talk about the importance of getting a flu shot to protect you and your family this flu season. And urologist Dr. Landon Trost will explain how erectile dysfunction can be an indicator of early cardiovascular disease.
 
October 08, 2016
Nutrition Facts
The Nutrition Facts label you find on your food packages is required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This label is supposed to provide detailed information about a food's nutrient content, such as the amount of fat, sugar, sodium and fiber it has, but, sometimes, these labels can confuse or mislead consumers. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, dietician Kate Zeratsky will help us understand food labels and we'll discuss the hot topic of ancient grains. Also on the program, family medicine physician Dr. Elizabeth Cozine will share the benefits of exercising during pregnancy. And, Shaun Heath, coordinator of the Mayo Clinic Bequest Program, explains how body donation plays a critical role in helping medical students master anatomy.
 
October 01, 2016
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 220,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in women each year in the U.S. That means breast cancer affects 1 in 8 women in their lifetime. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual campaign started back in 1985 to increase awareness of the disease. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, breast cancer specialist Dr. Sandhya Pruthi will discuss advancements in treatments and improved survival rates for breast cancer. Also on the program, breast surgeon Dr. Judy Boughey will explain the latest recommendations on contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and discuss whether a healthy breast should be removed as a preventative measure against future cancer risk. And Mayo Clinic colorectal surgeon Dr. Robert Cima shares five questions to ask your surgeon before surgery.
 
September 24, 2016
Pediatric Cancer

A cancer diagnosis is upsetting at any age but even more so when the patient is a child. According to the National Institutes of Health, it’s estimated that more than 10,000 new cases of pediatric cancer will be diagnosed among children in the U.S. this year. Worldwide, that number reaches 250,000. Although pediatric cancer death rates have declined by nearly 70 percent over the past four decades, cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease among children. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, pediatric hematologist/oncologist Dr. Carola Arndt will discuss the importance of research and clinical trials to improve pediatric cancer treatments. Also on the program, September is the first ever Rheumatic Disease Awareness Month. Rheumatologist Dr. Eric Matteson will explain diagnosis and treatment options for rheumatic diseases. And we will learn how medical marijuana is being used to treat disease symptoms and pain from addiction specialist Dr. Jon Ebbert.

 
September 17, 2016
Endometrial Cancer Research
Endometrial cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the layer of cells that form the lining (endometrium) of the uterus. Sometimes endometrial cancer is called uterine cancer. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gynecologic surgeon Dr. Jamie Bakkum-Gamez shares new research aimed at developing a minimally invasive test — using the DNA from a tampon — to detect endometrial cancer. This will be the first screening or early-detection test of its kind. Also on the program, pediatric urologist Dr. Candace Granberg and pediatric gynecologist Dr. Asma Javed will discuss the fertility preservation program at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. This program offers options for fertility rescue for children being treated for cancer or other medical conditions that could affect their fertility. And, physical therapy instructor Dr. Connie Bogard shares tips from the National Council on Aging on falls prevention
 
September 10, 2016
Functional Neurological Disorders
According to the National Institutes of Health, functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorders, are conditions in which you show psychological stress in physical ways. Conversion disorder can present as blindness, paralysis or other nervous system symptoms that cannot be explained by a physical illness or injury. Symptoms may occur because of emotional distress or psychological conflict, and they usually begin suddenly after a stressful experience or traumatic event. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, psychiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Staab will explain diagnosis and treatment of functional neurological disorders. Also on the program, Dr. Justin Kreuter, medical director of the Blood Donor Center on Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus, explains the urgent need for blood donations. Family medicine physician Dr. Elizabeth Cozine will have tips on foot care. And, Dr. Heidi Nelson talks about the importance of the human microbiome
 
September 03, 2016
Vericose Veins
Varicose veins — those gnarled, enlarged veins — usually show up in your legs and feet, because standing and walking upright increases the pressure in the veins of your lower body. For many people, varicose veins and spider veins — a common, mild variation of varicose veins — are simply a cosmetic concern. For other people, varicose veins can cause aching pain and discomfort, and sometimes lead to more serious problems. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, vascular surgeon Dr. Peter Gloviczki explains how treatment options for varicose veins have improved. He also shares his own personal story of how magic helped him become a doctor. Also on the program, women's sexual health expert Dr. Jordan Rullo will share the findings of a recent study on the connection among women, antidepressants and sexual dysfunction. And, endocrinologist Dr. Hossein Gharib will talk about diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism
 
August 27, 2016
Eating Disorders
While many people are concerned about what they eat and their body image, eating disorders are marked by extremes. Most eating disorders involve focusing too much on your weight, body shape and food, leading to dangerous eating behaviors. Eating disorders frequently first appear during the teen years and, according the National Institutes of Health, women are 2½ times more likely than men to develop an eating disorder. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, adolescent eating disorder expert Dr. Jocelyn Lebow will discuss diagnosis, treatment and prevention of eating disorders. Also on the program, gastroenterologist Dr. Conor Loftus explains new advances in colon cancer screening that have made the process easier and may improve colorectal cancer detection rates. And, #AskTheMayoMom pediatrician Dr. Angela Mattke talks about the hygiene hypothesis: Just how clean does your baby need to be?
 
August 20, 2016
Fecal Transplants
magine a gut bacteria so strong that it resists antibiotic treatment. Clostridium difficile (C-diff) can be difficult to treat, but a new approach — fecal microbiota transplant — has shown promise. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, C-diff patient Stephanie Bennett and her physician, gastroenterologist Dr. Sahil Khanna, share the story of her successful fecal transplant. Also on the program, transplant surgeon Dr. Mikel Prieto explains how Mayo Clinic's Living Donor Kidney Program uses paired donation or a living donor chain to decrease the wait time for kidney transplant. And, infectious diseases specialist Dr. Stacey Rizza outlines the risk of being infected with hepatitis C, especially for people born between 1945 and 1965
 
August 13, 2016
Menopausal Issues
According to The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), up to 45 percent of postmenopausal women find sex painful, but fewer than a quarter of those women seek treatment. Part of the reason women stay quiet might just be the name used to describe the condition — vaginal atrophy. To combat the stigma, the NAMS and the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health have introduced a new medical term — genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) in the hope that it will encourage more women to seek treatment. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, women's health expert Dr. Stephanie Faubion will discuss GSM and other menopause-related problems. Also on the program, care coordinator nurse RoxAnne Brennan will explain the EMERALD program for treating adolescent depression. And, a Mayo Clinic patient shares his heart transplant story.
 
August 06, 2016
Mental Illness
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 1 in 5 Americans lives with a mental health condition. Mental illness refers to a wide range of mental health conditions — disorders that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Examples of mental illness include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and addictive behaviors. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, psychiatrist Dr. Teresa Rummans will discuss mental illness and the challenges it presents. Also on the program, anesthesiologist Dr. Michael Joyner has tips on how to stay safe when exercising in extreme heat. And, urologist Dr. Landon Trost shares the latest research on testosterone therapy for older men
 
July 30, 2016
Smoking Cessation
Conventional wisdom says it takes five to seven attempts for most smokers to quit, but a new study published in BMJ Open says those estimates may be low. Researchers compiled data on more than 1,200 adult smokers in Canada and found that the real average number of quit attempts before succeeding may be closer to 30. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Jon Ebbert, internal medicine specialist and co-director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, offers some strategies to stop smoking. Also on the program ear, nose and throat specialist Dr. Matthew Carlson explains how hearing loss can be treated with cochlear implants. And, surgeon Dr. Michael Kendrick has an update on advances in laparoscopic pancreatic surgery.
 
July 23, 2016
Transgender Issues
According to the National Institutes of Health, transgender is an umbrella term for persons whose gender identity, gender expression, or behavior does not conform to that typically associated with the sex to which they were assigned at birth. When transgender individuals seek medically supervised services, they often encounter significant barriers to care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, endocrinologist Dr. Todd Nippoldt and clinical psychologist Dr. Cesar Gonzalez — both physicians in the Transgender and Intersex Specialty Care Clinic on Mayo Clinic's Rochester campus — will discuss minority stress and other issues faced by transgender individuals. Also on the program, anesthesiologist Dr. Michael Joyner covers the doping scandal that resulted in the Russian track and field team being banned from the upcoming Summer Olympic Games. And, internal medicine specialist Dr. Sherry-Ann Brown will share information on ataxia, a lack of muscle control during voluntary movements, in a unique manner — through her medical poetry.
 
July 16, 2016
Advance Directives
It’s not something anyone wants to think about: end-of-life care. But, it’s important to decide what kind of medical care is wanted when someone becomes too ill or hurt to express his or her wishes. Advance directives are legal documents that spell out decisions about end-of-life care ahead of time to avoid confusion later on among family, friends and health care professionals. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr Richard Sharp, director of the Biomedical Ethics Program at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, and Dr. Erin DeMartino, medical ethics researcher, share information on how to create an advance directive. Also on the program, dermatologist Dr. Jerry Brewer has tips on using sunscreen. And, anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel explains the exciting advances in the use of anesthesia.
 
July 09, 2016
GERD
Acid reflux and heartburn are common digestive conditions that many people experience from time to time. When these digestive problems happen more often and begin to interfere with your daily life, you may have gastroesophageal reflux disease, known as GERD, which is a chronic digestive disease that occurs when stomach acid flows back into your esophagus. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, gastroenterologist Dr. Jeffrey Alexander covers treatment for GERD and how lifestyle changes can improve the condition. Also on the program, obstetrician Dr. Yvonne Butler Tobah discusses the difficult subject of miscarriage. And, sports medicine specialist Dr. Ed Laskowski explains an all-too-common knee injury, the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
 
July 02, 2016
Immunotherapy & Melonoma
Traditionally, treatment for cancer has had three options: surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, or some combination of those three. But, there is fast becoming a fourth option for some types of cancer: immunotherapy, which is a biological therapy where the patient’s own immune system is activated to kill cancer cells. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, researchers Dr. Roxana Dronca and Dr. Richard Vile explain how this novel approach to fighting cancer is showing promise. Also on the program, dermatologist Dr. Jerry Brewer discusses the danger of melanoma. And, family medicine specialist Dr. Elizabeth Cozine breaks down the wide range of birth control options now available.
 
June 25, 2016
Silent Heart attack
A heart attack doesn’t always have symptoms, such as pain in your chest or shortness of breath. It’s possible to have a heart attack and not even know it. A silent heart attack can be mistaken for indigestion or a bout with the flu. According to the American Heart Association, upwards of 45 percent of all heart attacks are silent. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes will cover the symptoms and warning signs of silent heart attacks and why treatment is critical. Also on the program, parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt explains how the lone star tick can cause a meat allergy. And, neonatologist Dr. Christopher Colby will discuss new research on the connection between swaddling and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
 
June 18, 2016
Let's Run
The beginning of summer often motivates people to try running for the first time or to start running again after a layoff. According to a survey by the National Sporting Goods Association, more than 60 million people went running or jogging in 2015. On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Ed Laskowski, co-director of Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, will have tips on how to get started with a running routine, as well as the pros and cons of interval training. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic obstetrician Dr. Yvonne Butler Tobah will discuss advances in prenatal care, including Mayo Clinic's novel approach — dubbed OB Nest — for women with low-risk pregnancies. And, Mayo Clinic family medicine specialist Dr. Elizabeth Cozine will explain the viral infection known as shingles.
 
June 11, 2016
Suicide Prevention
ccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the rate of suicide in the U.S. increased 24 percent from 1999 to 2014. Suicide has long been thought of as a mental health problem, but the CDC now warns that it’s become a public health problem. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, psychologist Dr. Craig Sawchuk joins us to discuss suicide prevention. Also on the program, Dr. Richard Sharp, director of the Bioethics Program at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, explains how genetic testing can not only predict disease, but improve your health. And, oncologist and palliative care specialist Dr. Edward Creagan explains why regular physical activity is key to maintaining health as you age. Dr. Creagan is editor-in-chief of Mayo Clinic on Healthy Aging
 
June 04, 2016
The Milk Controversy
According to U.S. Department of Agriculture data, the amount of milk the average American drinks has declined almost 40 percent since 1970, and milk consumption in the U.S. fell to an all-time low in 2013. While the availability of more drink options, including milk substitutes, contributes to this decline, there is growing controversy about whether humans really need to drink cow’s milk at all. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, nutrition and preventive medicine specialist Dr. Donald Hensrud covers the milk controversy and other nutrition topics. Also on the program, infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh discusses the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. And, emergency medicine physician Dr. Annie Sadosty explains common reasons people visit the Emergency Department.
 
May 28, 2016
Migraine Headaches
A headache is usually just a minor inconvenience. But some headaches ... including migraines ... can ruin your whole day. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, neurologist Dr. Michael Cutrer discusses the different types of headache, what causes them and how they're treated. Also on the program, the West African Ebola epidemic has been declared over by the World Health Organization. The outbreak, which lasted two years and took more than 11,000 lives, raised concerns about a possible worldwide pandemic. Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh explains what's been learned that might help prevent another epidemic. And family medicine specialist Dr. Summer Allen offers helpful tips on newborn care.
 
May 21, 2016
Awareness Saturday
It's awareness Saturday on this episode of Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus
 
May 14, 2016
Stroke Awareness Month & National EMS Week
According to the American Heart Association, every 40 seconds someone in the U.S. has a stroke. During a stroke, about 2 million brains cells die each minute the stroke goes untreated. So, even if quick action is taken, it’s not surprising that stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in this country. May is American Stroke Month and on this episode of Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Robert Brown Jr. explains the warning signs of stroke and tips for stroke prevention.
National Emergency Medical Services Week. Dr. Dennis Laudon, Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician and medical director for Mayo One helicopter, and Kelly Sahs, director of clinical operations for Mayo Clinic Medical Transport, join the program to discuss new advances in emergency medical services.
 
May 07, 2016
Celiac Disease Awareness
Celiac disease is an immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Over time, this immune reaction produces inflammation that damages the small intestine's lining and prevents absorption of some nutrients. May is Celiac Awareness Month, and, on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, gastroenterologist Dr. Joseph Murray discusses just how common is celiac disease. Also on the program, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a hematologist and professor of medical education, shares research on physician burnout and possible solutions to this growing problem. And, May 9 is National Women's Checkup Day as part of National Women's Health Week. Family medicine physician Dr. Summer Allen has tips for women who want to make regular health checkups a part of their overall healthy living plan.
 
April 30, 2016
Zika Virus
Zika virus is a growing public health concern in the U.S. Zika virus disease is especially dangerous to pregnant women, because of its link to serious birth defects. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh provides an update on the spread of Zika virus. And, internal medicine specialist and vaccine researcher Dr. Gregory Poland has the latest on work to make a vaccine against Zika virus. Also on the program, do sleep tracking devices and apps really work? Sleep medicine specialists Dr. Bhanuprakash Kolla and Dr. Meghna Mansukhani discuss their study of which sleep trackers work best. And, undescended testicle in baby boys can be a worrisome problem, but it's often correctable. Pediatric urologist Dr. Candace Granberg explains how undescended testicle is treated.
 
April 23, 2016
Menopause
For women, there's no escaping menopause. And, while many women are happy to say goodbye to menstrual periods, menopause often brings with it a host of signs and symptoms that can turn life upside down. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Stephanie Faubion offers advice to women going through this major life change. Dr. Faubion is director of the Women's Health Clinic and Office of Women's Health at Mayo Clinic. She is also medical editor of the new book titled, Mayo Clinic — The Menopause Solution: A doctor's guide to relieving hot flashes, enjoying better sex, sleeping well, controlling your weight, and being happy. Also on the program, gastroenterologist Dr. Mark Larson explains what happens when you swallow chewing gum. And, Dr. Thomas Allison and Dr. Nora Sydo discuss a new study that found that fit former smokers were healthier than people who'd never smoked and who didn't exercise.
 
April 16, 2016
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C, one of several hepatitis viruses, is generally considered to be the most serious. Left untreated, hepatitis C can cause serious liver damage, cirrhosis and even death. Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Stacey Rizza outlines the hepatitis C risk, especially for people born between 1945 and 1965. Also on the program, allergy specialist Dr. Rohit Divekar explains why it's important to diagnose food allergies before they lead to life-threatening reactions. Colorectal surgeon Dr. John Pemberton discusses the causes of hemorrhoids and how they're treated. And, does luck play a role in whether or not you get cancer? Oncologist Dr. Timothy Moynihan reviews studies that analyze luck and cancer risk.
 
April 09, 2016
Opioid Abuse
Abuse of opioid pain medications is a serious health problem in the U.S. In an effort to address it, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new, more stringent guidelines for prescribing these powerful painkillers. Primary care internal medicine specialist Dr. Jon Ebbert discusses how opioids can best be used to treat acute and chronic pain. Also on the program, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky explains how prolonged stress can increase cholesterol levels. And, general internal medicine researcher Dr. James Kirkland talks about how destroying cells that contribute to frailty and other conditions associated with aging in mice may someday benefit humans.
 
April 02, 2016
Causes of Dementia
The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the number of people age 65 and older will almost double in the next 35 years. That increase is expected to be accompanied by a rise in cases of dementia. Geriatrician Dr. Ericka Tung explains what causes dementia and how it's treated. Also on the program, adults aren't the only ones who get kidney cancer; children can get it, too. Pediatric urologist Dr. Candace Granberg discusses kidney cancer in children. And, clinical psychologist and certified sex therapist Dr. Jordan Rullo reviews a new study about flibanserin (ADDYI), a drug used to treat low sex drive in women
 
March 26, 2016
Chronic Sinusitis
Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around your nasal passages become inflamed and swollen. Despite treatment attempts, it can last for eight weeks or more. Acute sinusitis causes similar symptoms, but usually lasts only a couple of weeks. Allergy specialist Dr. Rohit Divekar explains what causes sinusitis and how it's treated. Also on the program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 18 million adults and more than 6 million children in the U.S. have asthma. Dr. Divekar outlines the most effective asthma treatments. And, preventive medicine specialist Dr. Deborah Rhodes discusses how molecular breast imaging (MBI) can help identify breast cancer in dense breast tissue. Cancer survivor Kula Shives talks about how her breast cancer was found by MBI after being missed by mammography
 
March 19, 2016
Getting Enough Sleep
he amount of sleep you need varies with age, but, for most adults, it's seven to eight hours a night. Many of people don't get that much, and that can have serious consequences. On this edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, sleep medicine specialist Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler explains why getting adequate sleep is so important for good health. Also, infectious disease specialist Dr. Stacey Rizza has an update on tuberculosis. March 24 is World TB Day. And, pathologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt has the latest on a new bacterium that causes Lyme disease and how to protect against it.
 
March 12, 2016
Depression Screening
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 8 million adults in the U.S. are diagnosed with depression each year. That number may be just the tip of the iceberg, since many people with depression go undiagnosed and untreated. Psychologist Dr. Craig Sawchuk discusses new guidelines for depression screening, including screening expectant mothers. Also on the program, hematologist Dr. Rajiv Pruthi explains common blood tests and what they can tell your doctor. And, can nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) – the daily calories a person burns while doing normal, nonexercise activities – help you maintain a healthy weight? Wellness activity and assessment specialist Nolan Peterson outlines how NEAT activities, including vacuuming, climbing stairs, folding laundry, pacing, and even fidgeting can all help you burn calories.
 
March 05, 2016
Lung Cancer Update
Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Each year, it claims more lives than cancer of the breast, colon, prostate and ovaries combined. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, pulmonary and critical care medicine specialist Dr. Eric Edell explains what's behind this statistic ... and describes how low-dose CT lung scanning is helping to diagnose lung cancer earlier. Also on the program, the deadly trio of radon gas, carbon monoxide and lead in your home can result in illness or death if not detected. Occupational medicine specialist Dr. Laura Breeher outlines how to protect your family and yourself from these household health hazards. And, endocrinologist and diabetes expert Dr. Robert Rizza discusses why a diagnosis of prediabetes doesn't automatically mean you'll get diabetes.
 
February 27, 2016
Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
During American Heart Month ... a personal story of how a routine express care visit for the flu uncovered a potentially life-threatening heart condition. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Mayo Clinic Department of Public Affairs communications director Ron Petrovich shares his personal story about being diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). And heart disease specialist Dr. Jeffrey Geske joins the discussion about why it's critical to get treatment for HCM. Also on the program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. William Cross explains how the sometimes overlooked sacroiliac joints can cause of chronic back pain. And Dr. Thomas Allison answers the question, "Are hot tubs safe ... and can using them be good for your health?" Dr. Allison is director of the Sports Cardiology Clinic and the Integrated Stress Testing Center at Mayo Clinic.
 
February 21, 2016
Children's Bone Health
one health is important throughout our lives ... but it's crucial during childhood ... when we acquire nearly all of our bone mass. Building healthy bones and diagnosing bone disorders, including scoliosis, early are key to lifelong bone health. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, pediatric orthopedic surgeon Dr. Todd Milbrandt outlines how to ensure healthy bone development. Also on the program, urinary tract infection (UTI) isn't just an adult problem. Pediatric urologist Dr. Candace Granberg discusses diagnosing and treating UTI in kids. And the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently issued updated recommendations for breast cancer screening. Dr. Karthik Ghosh, director of the Mayo Clinic Breast Diagnostic Clinic, offers advice for sorting through the guidelines.
 
February 13, 2016
Urinary Incontinence
Urinary incontinence ... the loss of bladder control ... can be distressing and embarrassing. But just "living with it" isn't the only option. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, urologist Dr. Daniel Elliott outlines several effective treatments for urinary incontinence. Also on the program, if you've been sick for a few days with vomiting, diarrhea and low-grade fever, you may have fallen victim to what's sometimes called "winter vomiting virus." Family medicine specialist Dr. Summer Allen explains norovirus infection ... why it's common and how to avoid it. And obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects more than 3 million children and adults in the U.S. Psychologist Dr. Craig Sawchuk discusses the diagnosis and treatment of OCD.
 
February 06, 2016
Evaluating Health News
>News reports about health and medicine are often informative and useful. But sometimes, health news can miss the point or be misleading ... leaving you wondering what to do. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, preventive medicine specialist Dr. Donald Hensrud and gastroenterologist Dr. Joseph Murray offer some guidelines for separating hype from reality in health news reports. Also on the program, oncologist and palliative care specialist Dr. Edward Creagan explains why regular physical activity is key to maintaining health as you age. Dr. Creagan is editor-in-chief of Mayo Clinic on Healthy Aging. And occupational medicine specialist Dr. Laura Breeher discusses the risks of lead poisoning and how to prevent it.
 
January 30, 2016
Epilepsy
Temporary confusion ... a staring spell ... tingling or numbness ... uncontrollable jerking of the arms, legs or body. All these are signs and symptoms of epilepsy. Each year, about 150,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with epilepsy. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, neurologist Dr. Gregory Cascino discusses epilepsy treatments that allow many with the condition to live normal lives. Also on the program, Dr. Veronique Roger, a cardiologist and medical director of the Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, explains health care delivery science and how it's improving treatment outcomes. And endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers explains why the tiny parathyroid glands in your neck are key to the normal function of every cell in your body.
 
January 16, 2016
Robot-Assisted Surgery
Robots in the operating room aren't something out of science fiction ... they're a reality. Surgeons are using robots to assist them in a growing number of surgeries ... including heart valve repair and hysterectomy. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, cardiac surgeon Dr. Joseph Dearani explains how robots are helping to make operations less invasive, leading to shorter recovery times. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers discusses how diet, weight-bearing exercise and medications are used to slow the effects of osteoporosis. And hearing and speech specialist Dr. Douglas Sladen talks about a new drug being tested that may help slow or stop age-related hearing loss
 
January 09, 2016
Healthy-Aging Strategies
We can spend much of our lives looking forward to our "golden years" ... but when we get there, we may be greeted by aches, pains and chronic illness. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, oncologist and palliative care specialist Dr. Edward Creagan talks about how you can stack the odds of aging with health in your favor. Dr. Creagan is author of Mayo Clinic on Healthy Aging: How to Find Happiness and Vitality for a Lifetime, and posts regularly on the Mayo Clinic Healthy Aging blog. Also on the program, Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, discusses a recent study of the risks associated with some dietary supplements. And, urologist and surgeon Dr. Daniel Elliott explains why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently changed the medical device classification for transvaginal mesh used to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP).
 
January 02, 2016
The Year in Medical Research
On this special New Year's edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, we look back at some of the leading-edge research featured on the program in 2015. Dr. Robert Jenkins, a pathologist and specialist in laboratory genetics, discusses advances in treating brain tumors called gliomas. And cancer researcher Dr. Richard Vile explains why he changed the course of his work to search for a cure using tumor cells from a girl who died of brain cancer. Also on the program ... gastroenterologist Dr. Purna Kashyap describes the human microbiome and why the microorganisms living in our guts may hold clues for cures to some major diseases. And gastroenterologist Dr. Sahil Khanna shares information about how stool transplantation is being used to cure hard-to-treat digestive tract illnesses.
 
December 26, 2015
Long Term Care
Choosing long-term care for a loved one ... or yourself ... can be a difficult decision. The level of care, the cost and the physical surroundings all must be considered. Mayo Clinic geriatric specialist Dr. Paul Takahashi offers guidance on how to evaluate long-term care facilities and services. Also on the program, parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt talks about her unusual blog, "Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites: A Parasitologist's View of the World."And Dr. John Weroha explains how mouse avatars are helping in the fight against cancer in humans.
 
December 19, 2015
Managing High Blood Pressure
It's estimated that about 30 percent of adults in the U.S. have high blood pressure. An important part of managing hypertension is blood pressure monitoring. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, hypertension specialist Dr. Stephen Textor explains how you can track your blood pressure at home. Also on the program, emergency medicine specialist Dr. Donald Jenkins describes how a drug that was designed to save lives on the battlefield is now being used to control blood loss during routine surgery. And, are you allergic to your Christmas tree? Allergy specialist Dr. Rohit Divekar has tips for handling allergies that turn up during the holidays.
 
December 12, 2015
Diabetes Update
On Mayo Clinic Radio, diabetes specialist Dr. Robert Rizza discusses the diabetes epidemic. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Bart Clarke offers recommendations for calcium intake. And with the official start of winter just around the corner ... emergency medicine specialist Dr. David Nestler has tips on cold weather safety.
 
December 05, 2015
Sleep Disorders
According to the CDC, between 50 and 70 million people in the U.S. have sleep disorders ... including sleep apnea. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, sleep medicine specialist Dr. Eric Olson explains how sleep apnea is diagnosed and treated. Also on the program, back pain is one of the most common reasons why people see their doctors. Pain management specialist Dr. Jason Eldrige discusses managing this common medical problem. And anesthesiologist Dr. William Mauck describes how functional electrical stimulation ... or FES ... is used to treat chronic leg and back pain when other treatments fail.
 
November 28, 2015
Alzheimer’s Update
It was 33 years ago that President Ronald Reagan launched the first national Alzheimer's disease awareness campaign. Since then, research has developed ways to manage symptoms ... but the search for a cure continues. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Ronald Petersen, a neurologist and director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, discusses the progress being made in treating Alzheimer's. Also on the program, gastroenterologist Dr. Paul Limburg outlines the latest colon cancer screening guidelines and what they mean for you. And psychiatrist Dr. William Leasure explains how seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is diagnosed and treated.
 
November 21, 2015
Nicotine Addiction
According to the American Cancer Society, tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S. Despite that, some 42 million Americans still smoke cigarettes, and more start every day. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Jon Ebbert, who treats patients at the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, talks about the latest approaches to quitting smoking. Also on the program, keeping a food diary may be the most effective way to avoid unwanted weight gain during the holidays. Psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe explains why. And registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky has healthful tips for turning traditional holiday fare into dishes that taste good, but that won't break your calorie bank.
 
November 14, 2015
Postpartum Depression
According to the National Cancer Institute, by the end of this year 49,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer ... and an estimated 41,000 will die from the disease. Pancreatic cancer remains a challenge to treat, but newer combination therapies are modestly improving survival rates. Cancer surgeon Dr. Mark Truty discusses the latest treatments, and pancreatic cancer survivor Dick Hansen shares his personal story. Also on the program, certified nurse midwife Julie Lamppa describes the signs and symptoms of postpartum depression ... and why it's so important to get treatment. And pediatric and adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Robert Jacobson explains why the new field of population health management offers hope for improving healthcare by make it more convenient.
 
November 07, 2015
PTSD
Flashbacks ... nightmares ... severe anxiety. These are just some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder ... or PTSD. Soldiers returning from combat aren't the only people who may shows signs of PTSD. On this special Veteran's Day edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, psychologist Dr. Craig Sawchuk outlines the risk factors and treatments for PTSD. Also on the program, high-tech developments have made artificial limbs more flexible and functional for wounded warriors. Dr. Kenton Kaufman, a biomechanical engineer who designs artificial limbs, explains why. And retired Army Staff Sergeant Daniel Metzdorf lost a leg while serving in Iraq, but he hasn't let that slow him down. Metzdorf tells how he started the Alive Day project that's given new meaning to his life.
 
October 31, 2015
Parkison's Disease
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. A slight tremor in one hand is often the first outward sign of Parkinson's. And, while there is no cure, there are medications and other treatments that can effectively manage its signs and symptoms. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, neurologist Dr. J. Eric Ahlskog discusses treating Parkinson's. Dr. Ahlskog is the author of the new book,The New Parkinson's Disease Treatment Book: Partnering with Your Doctor to Get the Most from Your Medications. Also on the program, ophthalmologist Dr. Sophie Bakri explains the alarming symptoms of retinal detachment ... and why it's critical to get immediate treatment. And trauma and critical care specialist Dr. Donald Jenkins has advice for parents on keeping children safe this Halloween.
 
October 24, 2015
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stem cell transplantation, also known as bone marrow transplantation, has come a long way since it was first tried in the early part of the 20th century. Since then, stem cell transplants have become standard treatment for a number of cancers and other blood-related diseases and conditions. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, pediatric oncologist Dr. Shakila Khan explains how stem cell transplantation works. Also on the program, dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis has advice on what to do when your child comes home with head lice. And thorough hand-washing is still the best way to prevent getting a cold or the flu. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Priya Sampathkumar has tips for staying healthy during cold and flu season.
 
October 17, 2015
Breast Cancer Update
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and on the next program breast cancer specialist Dr. Sandhya Pruthi discusses the latest in diagnosis and treatment, including the debate over whether ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is an early form of breast cancer. Also on the program, by age 80 more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Ophthalmologist Dr. Sophie Bakri explains why cataracts form and how they're treated. And gastroenterologist Dr. Jean Fox offers advice on managing constipation.
 
October 10, 2015
Thyroid Issues
The thyroid gland works as one of the body's control centers ... helping to regulate heart rate and metabolism. When your thyroid gland isn't working properly, it can cause a number of problems ... including hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, endocrinologist Dr. Marius Stan discusses thyroid disorders and how they're treated. Also on the program, gastroenterologist Dr. Jean Fox explains the causes of bloating. And pain management specialist Dr. Jason Eldrige offers suggestions for treating chronic pain, a condition that affects more than 25 million Americans.
 
October 03, 2015
Varicose Veins
Varicose veins and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are common blood vessel disorders. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, cardiovascular disease specialist Dr. Thom Rooke explains the differences between the two - and why PAD is a sign of a serious condition. Also on the program, the Patient Revolution Project is helping patients and caregivers get more out of their time together. Project creative director Maggie Breslin and Dr. Victor Montori, project medical director, offer advice on becoming a proactive patient. And pediatrician and sleep disorders specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal discusses restless legs syndrome.
 
September 26, 2015
Obesity Treatments
According to the CDC, more than one-third of all adults in the U.S. are obese. That puts them at increased risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, gastroenterologist Dr. Barham Abu Dayyeh explains a new balloon therapy designed to enhance weight loss in some obese people. Gastroenterologist Dr. Andres Acosta Cardenas discusses the five categories of obesity. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe outlines the role mental preparation plays in losing weight and keeping it off. Also on the program, Dr. Stephanie Faubion, internal medicine specialist and director of the Mayo Clinic Women's Health Clinic, describes the risks of low testosterone in women.
 
September 19, 2015
Neuromuscular Diseases
Neuromuscular diseases ... including muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) ... are often debilitating and sometimes fatal. On this week's program, we'll have the latest on research and treatment of these diseases from neurologist Dr. Eric Sorenson. Also on the program, Dr. Keith Stewart, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, explains how personalized medicine is providing the right patient with the right drug at the right dose at the right time. And kidney specialist Dr. William Haley discusses a landmark study that showed a significant reduction in the risk of cardiovascular complications and death when systolic blood pressure is lowered to 120 mm Hg in people being treated for high blood pressure.
 
September 12, 2015
Nutrition in the News
Kale, coffee and coconut oil. Which ones are good for you ... and which ones aren't? On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, internal and preventive medicine specialist Dr. Donald Hensrud answers those and other nutrition questions in the news. Also on the program, an update from certified sex therapist Dr. Jordan Rullo on flibanserin ... sometimes called "female Viagra"... recently approved for women with low libido. And Dr. Mark Wylam, a specialist in pediatric and adolescent medicine, explains a new study that exposed the risks of using mineral oil for constipation in children.
 
September 05, 2015
Human Microbiome
Ecosystems usually refer to places on the earth, like forests or deserts. But our bodies have ecosystems, too. Collectively called the "human microbiome," these communities of organisms help keep us healthy. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, gastroenterologist Dr. Purna Kashyap discusses how the human microbiome works. Also on the program, infectious disease specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh explains when it might be OK to stop taking an antibiotic early. Stool transplantation is being used to treat serious digestive diseases, and gastroenterologist Dr. Sahil Khanna describes how this new treatment works. And physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Dr. Nathan LeBrasseur talks about ways to slow the aging process.
 
August 29, 2015
Ovarian Cancer
According to the American Cancer Society, about 21,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year ... and more than 14,000 will die from the disease. September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and on the next program, gynecologic cancer specialist Dr. Jamie Bakkum-Gamez discusses diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Joining her is ovarian cancer survivor Cynthia Weiss, who describes her personal journey. Also on the program, family medicine specialist Dr. Elizabeth Cozine explains the treatment of family dysfunction. And cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky offers 10 tips for lowering high blood pressure without using medication.
 
August 22, 2015
Quality Health Care
Quality health care is something we all want. But what does it mean ... and how can we find it? This week on Mayo Clinic Radio, endocrinologist Dr. Victor Montori outlines the criteria you can use in choosing a quality provider. Also on the program, one of the most common problems men have as they age is an enlarged prostate gland - urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains how an enlarged prostate, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, is diagnosed and treated; and severe pain, swelling and decreased range of motion in your thumb may be a sign of arthritis - orthopedic surgeon Dr. Sanjeev Kakar discusses what can be done to treat thumb arthritis.
 
August 15, 2015
Sleep Needs
The end of summer is fast approaching ... and millions of youngsters across the country are getting ready to return to the classroom. On this back-to-school edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, children's sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal outlines how much sleep children need to be fully engaged in class. Also on the program, pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Robert Jacobson provides an update on vaccines. Sports medicine specialist Dr. David Soma talks about preparing for school sports. And psychiatrist Dr. Paul Croarkin has tips for parents on what to watch for when a child seems anxious or depressed.
 
August 08, 2015
Integrative Medicine
Once viewed with skepticism, complementary and integrative medicine is now playing an increasingly important role in modern health care.

On the next program, Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic, outlines the contributions integrative medicine is making in treating the whole person. Also on the program, a recent study found that widely-used cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins may be of benefit to an even larger number of people who are at risk of heart disease. Cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses the results. And, orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Sperling explains how getting an artificial shoulder may restore movement you thought was lost forever.
 
August 01, 2015
Doctor Shortages
Primary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. And Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being used to provide more efficient care. And psychologist and eating-disorder specialist Dr. Karen Grothe explains binge eating and how it's treated.
 
July 27, 2015
Antibiotic Resistance
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23,000 people die each year in the U.S. as the result of antibiotic-resistant infections. Antibiotics are powerful weapons in the fight against infection, but misuse or overuse can create a serious health risk. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish ToshMayo Clinic Proceedings may help predict who is most vulnerable to opioid pain medication addiction. Anesthesiologist and pain management specialist Dr. Michael Hooten explains the study's results. And family medicine specialist Dr. John Wilkinson discusses the current recommendations for when to get a complete physical exam.
 
July 20, 2015
Breast Surgery
For most women, breast surgery means mastectomy. But there are other types of breast surgery, including breast reconstruction and breast augmentation. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, surgeon Dr. Steven Jacobson discusses the different kinds of breast surgery. Also on the program, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has released draft guidelines for breast cancer screening. Dr. Sandhya Pruthi, who evaluates and treats women in the Mayo Clinic Breast Diagnostic Clinic, offers her assessment of the new guidelines. And dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis has tips for managing nail fungal infections and hair loss.
 
July 11, 2015
Kidney Stones
They're often no larger than a grain of sand ... but they can be extremely painful. Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in your kidneys, and they're more common during the summer months. On this week's program, urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains what causes kidney stones and how they're treated. Also on the show, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses a new study that shows cardiovascular benefits from eating both dark and milk chocolate. And anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel reviews the latest advances in high-tech anesthesia.
 
July 04, 2015
IBD and IBS
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different chronic digestive system conditions that are sometimes confused with one another. On this week's program, gastroenterologists Dr. Sunanda Kane and Dr. Yuri Saito discuss the differences between IBD and IBS, and explain how each is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Thomas Allison, director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Cardiology Program, talks about a simple treadmill test that can help predict whether you'll live 10 years or more. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe has strategies for keeping the weight off after losing it.
 
June 27, 2015
Brain Tumors
According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 23,000 new cases of brain cancer were diagnosed in the U.S. last year. Of those, about one-third were gliomas ... a type of brain cancer that's particularly hard to treat. On this week's program, Dr. Robert Jenkins, a pathologist and specialist in laboratory genetics, explains new research that may lead to more effective treatments for gliomas. And scientist Dr. Richard Vile describes how a teenage girl with brain cancer changed the focus of his research. Also on the program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Sperling talks about rotator cuff injury ... what it is and how it's repaired. And, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that about 240 people go to the emergency room each day during the weeks around the Fourth of July with fireworks-related injuries. Surgeon and trauma specialist Dr. Donald Jenkins discusses the hazards of using fireworks at home.
 
June 20, 2015
Fertility and Conception
Fertility ... the ability to make a baby ... is affected by a host of factors. From diet and stress ... to age and genetics ... they all play a role in success or failure when trying to conceive. On this week's program, Dr. Jani Jensen, a specialist in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, discusses her new book, Mayo Clinic Guide to Fertility and Conception. Also on the program, cases of osteomyelitis ... an infection of the bone ... are on the rise, especially among older adults. We find out what's behind this increase from orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Huddleston. And dermatologist Dr. Jerry Brewer has insights into the disturbing upward trend in cases of melanoma.
 
June 13, 2015
Treating Mesothelioma
Malignant mesothelioma, cancer of the lining of the lungs and abdomen, is relatively rare but often fatal. The 5-year survival rate is between just 5 and 10 percent. On this week's program, thoracic surgeon Dr. Dennis Wigle and pulmonary and critical care medicine specialist Dr. Tobias Peikert explain how viruses are being used to treat mesothelioma and increase the odds of survival. Also on the program, Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Mayo Clinic Women's Health Clinic, discusses hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women and the new drug designed to treat HSDD. And geriatrician Dr. Paul Takahashi talks about how to detect and prevent malnutrition in older adults.
 
June 06, 2015
Lumps and Bumps
Lumps and bumps are outward signs our bodies use to alert us that something might not be right on the inside. But not all lumps and bumps are signs of illness. Mayo Clinic surgeon Dr. David Farley explains which lumps and bumps signal something serious ... and which ones don't. Also on the program, it's tick season, and parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt explains how to protect against tick-borne diseases. And registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky has useful suggestions for how to plan a picnic that combines good nutrition and food safety.
 
May 30, 2015
Transplant Update
Human organ transplantation has come a long way since the first heart transplant in 1967. But despite advances, there are still more than 100,000 people in the U.S. waiting for a donor organ. We'll get an update on the state of organ transplantation from the director of the William J. von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Brooks Edwards. We'll also hear from transplant surgeon Dr. Charles Rosen, who led teams that performed five liver transplants in one 24-hour period. Also on the program, springtime allergies are at their peak, and allergy specialist Dr. Rohit Divekar has tips for reducing symptoms. And pediatric surgeon Dr. Christopher Moir explains how to prevent pediatric falls among young children.
 
May 23, 2015
Osteoporosis
As we age, our bones may lose mass and become brittle. These are the signs and symptoms of osteoporosis. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis is responsible for 2 million broken bones each year in the U.S. Mayo Clinic endocrinologist Dr. Bart Clarke discusses osteoporosis and how to reduce its impact on your health. Also on the program, we explore the world of teeth whiteners ... what works and what doesn't ... with Mayo Clinic dentist Dr. Phillip Sheridan. And pediatric allergy expert Dr. Martha Hartz will join us to discuss food allergies and asthma in children.
 
May 16, 2015
Choosing Senior Care
Choosing long-term care for a loved one ... or yourself ... can be a difficult decision. The level of care, the cost and the physical surroundings all must be considered. Mayo Clinic geriatric specialist Dr. Paul Takahashi offers guidance on how to evaluate long-term care facilities and services. Also on the program, parasitologist Dr. Bobbi Pritt talks about her unusual blog, Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites: A Parasitologist's View of the World. And Dr. John Weroha explains how mouse avatars are helping to fight cancer in humans.
 
May 09, 2015
Stroke Awareness
A sudden numbness in your face, difficulty speaking, a severe headache. These are signs and symptoms of a stroke. Each year, nearly 800,000 people in the U.S. have a stroke. May is Stroke Awareness Month and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, neurologist Dr. Robert Brown, Jr., talks about diagnosis and treatment of stroke. Also on the program, proton beam therapy uses highly focused radiation to treat tumors while reducing damage to surrounding tissue. Radiation oncologist Dr. Robert Foote explains how it works. And we'll have the basics on how to get the most out of sunscreen from dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis.
 
May 02, 2015
Dense-Breast Imaging
It's well known that women with dense breast tissue are less likely to get accurate results from mammograms. Now there's a new breast-imaging technology called Molecular Breast Imaging, or MBI, that shows promise for increasing the rate of detection of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breasts. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Dr. Deborah Rhodes, Dr. Michael O'Connor and Dr. Katie Jones discuss MBI. Also on the program, nurses Margo Kroshus and Sherry Rengstorf share their advice and insights about hospice care. And cardiologist Dr. Bruce Fye talks about his new book, Caring for the Heart: Mayo Clinic and the Rise of Specialization.
 
April 25, 2015
Precision Medicine
Precision medicine ... also called individualized medicine ... got special attention recently when President Obama announced a Precision Medicine Initiative and called for the creation of a national biobank. On this week's program, Dr. Keith Stewart, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, discusses the biobank and what it might mean for the future of health care. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe explains the importance of a psychological evaluation when planning weight-loss surgery. And preventive medicine specialist Dr. Phil Hagen talks about how Mayo Clinic and Google have teamed up to increase the odds of finding reliable health information on the Web.
 
April 18, 2015
Managing Prescriptions
Taking a prescription drug can be confusing. And taking several medications ... some before breakfast and others just before bed ... can multiply the challenges. On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio, pharmacist Jeremy Anderson answers common questions about managing your prescriptions. Also on the program, gynecologic oncologist Dr. Jamie Bakkum-Gamez talks about a new screening test for endometrial cancer that uses tampons. And we'll discuss ringing in your ears, known as tinnitus (TIN-ih-tus), with Mayo Clinic audiologist Dr. Janalene Niichel.
 
April 11, 2015
e-Patient Dave
In the past, in even the best of doctor-patient relationships, it was usually the doctor who made the final decision about treatment. Now that's changing. On this week's program, we explore "participatory medicine" with patient-engagement advocate Dave deBronkhart, Jr., better known to his blog followers as e-Patient Dave. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist Dr. Raymond Iezzi, Jr., talks about the bionic eye, an implant that brings sight to people with serious vision impairment.
 
April 04, 2015
The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness
Hernias are a common medical problem. Each year in the U.S., about 800,000 inguinal hernias are surgically repaired. On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio, surgeon Dr. David Farley explains what hernias are and who's at risk. Also on the program, Dr. Amit Sood discusses his new book, The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness: A Four-Step Plan for Resilient Living. And Dr. Douglas Sladen explains how the latest advances in cochlear implants are giving people with serious hearing loss the chance to hear again.
 
March 28, 2015
Spring Training
The Major League baseball season is about to begin, and for many of us it signals the start of outdoor fitness activities. To avoid injury, it's a good idea to do some spring training before jumping into your favorite sport. On this week's program, Mayo Clinic sports medicine specialist Dr. Ed Laskowski has tips for getting back in shape. Also on the show, preventive and occupational medicine specialist Dr. Phil Hagen explains how wearable digital fitness devices can enhance your workout. And we learn about vertigo and how it's treated from audiologist Dr. Neil Shepard.
 
March 21, 2015
Colon Cancer Awareness
Colon cancer remains the second-leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the U.S. On this week's program, we hear about #strongarmselfie, the Twitter campaign to raise awareness and funds for a cure. Gastroenterologist Dr. Paul Limburg explains why the best test for colon cancer is the one you get. Also on the program, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Dr. Allen Brown discusses why older adults are as vulnerable as athletes to traumatic brain injury. And we'll have suggestions for choosing palliative care from general internal medicine specialist Dr. Jacob Strand.
 
March 14, 2015
Alzheimer’s Disease
It's estimated that 5 million Americans age 65 and older may have Alzheimer's disease. And with an aging population on the rise, that number is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years. On this week's program, Dr. Ronald Petersen, director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, has the latest on advances in treatment and the search for a cure. Also on the program, Dr. Amit Sood offers helpful tips on how to "unplug" with brief moments of stress-reducing meditation during even the busiest of days.
 
March 07, 2015
Spinal Stenosis
Stay active to keep fit. That can be difficult for people with spinal stenosis, a condition that causes serious back pain. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Huddleston explains how spinal stenosis is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Stephen Ekker discusses how the tiny zebrafish is helping to uncover treatments for everything from nicotine dependence to hearing loss. And we'll have the latest on recurring fever in children from Mayo Clinic pediatrician Dr. Thomas Boyce.
 
February 28, 2015
Mucus: Your Body's Secret Weapon
Mucus. It isn’t pretty, but it’s a frontline weapon in the fight against the common cold and sinusitis. On this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio, ENT specialist Dr. Erin O’Brien explains why. Also on the program, Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Rekha Mankad answers listener questions about heart health. And Mayo Clinic urologist Dr. Jeffrey Karnes discusses the pros and cons of the PSA test for prostate cancer.
 
February 21, 2015
Cardiac Regeneration
On this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio, fixing a broken heart. Cardiac regeneration uses the body’s own stem cells to repair damage done by heart disease. Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Atta Behfar explains. Also on the program, nicotine dependency expert Dr. Richard Hurt discusses results of a new study about the stop-smoking drug varenicline (Chantix). And Mayo Clinic registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky explains the risks of juice-only diets.
 
February 14, 2015
Men's Heart Health
Can erectile dysfunction (ED) predict heart disease? Find out on this week’s Mayo Clinic Radio. Cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky explains the connection between ED and possible heart problems. Also on Mayo Clinic Radio, it’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, and Dr. Thomas Salinas discusses children’s oral health.
 
February 07, 2015
The Measles Outbreak
The measles outbreak continues to grow in the U.S. We’ll have the latest from Mayo Clinic pediatrician Dr. Robert Jacobson. Also on Mayo Clinic Radio, it’s American Heart Month, and cardiologist Dr. Sharonne Hayes will discuss women’s heart health. And we’ll talk with dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis about caring for winter skin problems.
 
January 31, 2015
Improving Intimacy
Do you and your partner have less time for intimacy than you’d like? Mayo Clinic psychologist and certified sex therapist Dr. Jordan Rullo has tips you can use on the next Mayo Clinic Radio. Also on the program, glaucoma and macular degeneration are leading causes of blindness. We’ll talk with Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist Dr. Sophie Bakri about these and other vision problems.